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Behavioral, Emotional, and Social Well-Being in Children Who Stutter: Evidence from the National Health Interview Survey

  • Patrick M. Briley
  • Kevin O’Brien
  • Charles EllisEmail author
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Abstract

Stuttering is a disorder that has been associated with anxiety and other aspects of negatively impacted well-being due to disruptions in the communicative process. The objective of this study was to explore behavioral, emotional and social well-being among children who stutter (CWS) and children who do not stutter (CWNS), using national data. Data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) (2010-2015) were analyzed to examine behavioral, emotional, and social well-being in CWS compared to CWNS using responses from the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Chi-square tests of independence were used for comparing categorical variables and independent samples t-tests for comparing continuous variables. Multiple logistic regression analyses were used for determining odds of reporting symptoms of the SDQ. This sample included 48,319 children of which 503 were CWS. CWS were far more likely to: have worries or often seems worried (OR = 1.86), be unhappy/depressed (OR = 2.14), and have difficulties with emotions (OR = 3.26) than their non-stuttering peers. Similarly, CWS were less likely to: be well behaved/do what was requested (OR = .305) or have good attention and complete tasks (OR = .470). Finally, CWS with coexisting developmental disabilities had higher scores on all subscales of the SDQ when compared to CWS without developmental disabilities. Problems associated with well-being issues appear more common among CWS than CWNS in this national sample. These observed problems were even greater in CWS with coexisting developmental disabilities. These issues should be carefully considered and addressed as part of a comprehensive management plan for CWS.

Keywords

Stuttering Children Behavioral Emotional Social Well-being 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Ethical Approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

This study was completing using deidentified data and was classified exempt by the institional review board (IRB). For this type of study formal consent is not required.

Conflict of Interest

The authors have no conflicts of interest to declare.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick M. Briley
    • 1
  • Kevin O’Brien
    • 2
  • Charles Ellis
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Communication Sciences & Disorders, Communication Equity and Outcomes LaboratoryEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of BiostatisticsEast Carolina UniversityGreenvilleUSA

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