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Journal of Behavioral Medicine

, Volume 42, Issue 4, pp 658–673 | Cite as

Firearm-related behaviors following firearm injury: changes in ownership, carrying and storage

  • Vivian H. LyonsEmail author
  • Frederick P. Rivara
  • Alice Ning-Xue Yan
  • Cara Currier
  • Erin Ballsmith
  • Kevin P. Haggerty
  • Lauren Whiteside
  • Anthony S. Floyd
  • Anjum Hajat
  • Ali Rowhani-Rahbar
Article

Abstract

Individuals who sustain nonfatal gunshot wound (GSW) injuries are at substantially increased risk of subsequent firearm injury. There is a dearth of literature examining what, if any, firearm-related behavior changes occur among adults as a result of GSW injuries. Using survey data on firearm-related behaviors from an ongoing randomized controlled trial, we sought to describe changes in reported firearm-related behaviors among GSW patients following their injury. Our results suggest that patients with a GSW, especially firearm owners, may change their firearm-related behaviors following injury, some by increasing firearm-related safety and others by increasing frequency of behaviors that may place them at increased risk of subsequent injury. This study highlights the need for further examination of firearm-related behavior change among GSW patients and development of interventions to promote firearm safety among this population.

Keywords

Firearm ownership Firearm carrying Firearm storage Gunshot wound Behavior change 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank Elizabeth Griffin, MSW, Alvaro Martinez, Manal Jmaileh, Tamara Almira, and Navya Gunaje for their valuable contributions to this study.

Funding

Funding for this study was provided by the City of Seattle (contracts DA16-1570, DA17-1570, DA18-1570, and DA19-1570) in 2016-2019, Arnold Ventures in 2017–2018, and the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health (UL1 TR002319 and TL1 TR002318) in 2018–2019. The views expressed in this report are the authors’ and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funders.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

Vivian H. Lyons, Frederick P. Rivara, Alice Ning-Xue Yan, Cara Currier, Erin Ballsmith, Kevin P. Haggerty, Lauren Whiteside, Anthony S. Floyd, Anjum Hajat and Ali Rowhani-Rahbar declare that they have no conflicts of interest.

Human and animal rights and Informed consent

All procedures followed were in accordance with ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2000. Informed consent was obtained from all patients for being included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vivian H. Lyons
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Frederick P. Rivara
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Alice Ning-Xue Yan
    • 2
  • Cara Currier
    • 2
  • Erin Ballsmith
    • 2
  • Kevin P. Haggerty
    • 2
    • 4
    • 5
  • Lauren Whiteside
    • 2
    • 6
  • Anthony S. Floyd
    • 1
    • 7
  • Anjum Hajat
    • 1
  • Ali Rowhani-Rahbar
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology, School of Public HealthUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  2. 2.Harborview Injury Prevention and Research CenterUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  3. 3.Department of Pediatrics, School of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  4. 4.School of Social WorkUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  5. 5.Social Development Research GroupUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  6. 6.Department of Emergency Medicine, School of MedicineUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA
  7. 7.Alcohol and Drug Abuse InstituteUniversity of WashingtonSeattleUSA

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