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An Instructional Package for Teaching Geometric Shapes to Elementary Students with Moderate Intellectual Disability

  • Samantha Matthews Orihuela
  • Belva C. CollinsEmail author
  • Amy D. Spriggs
  • Harold Kleinert
Original Paper
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

In this study, we used an instructional package consisting of a constant time delay procedure with multiple exemplars to teach five elementary students with moderate intellectual disability to identify geometric shapes listed in their state’s core content standards and included on their state’s alternate assessment. In addition, we included four pieces of nontargeted information (i.e., identification of shape words, spelling of shape words, number of sides on shapes, and number of angles in shapes) as instructive feedback in each trial. The students acquired identification of the targeted shapes. They also demonstrated high degrees of maintenance and generalization to novel exemplars. In addition, they acquired the majority of the nontargeted information.

Keywords

Geometry Math core content Constant time delay Multiple exemplars Nontargeted information Instructive feedback 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors of this study received no funding to conduct this research and have no conflicts of interest.

Human and Animal Right Statement

The procedures performed with human subjects were conducted in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional review board at the institution where this study was conducted.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from the parents of the students involved in this study, and permission was granted from the school they attended.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Bourbon County SchoolsParisUSA
  2. 2.University of North Carolina at CharlotteCharlotteUSA
  3. 3.University of Kentucky‎LexingtonUSA
  4. 4.Employment SolutionsLexingtonUSA

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