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The resistance temperature stability of ITO film strain gauge: detailed investigate the influence mechanism of (100) preferred orientation of ITO film

  • Haoting Sun
  • Shiping Zhao
  • Weichao Chen
  • Jin Lin
  • Zehui Wang
  • Yutao Lin
  • Guozeng Li
  • Chaoqian Liu
  • Hualin Wang
  • Weiwei Jiang
  • Hualong Tao
  • Shimin Liu
  • Nan Wang
  • Yunxian Cui
  • Wanyu DingEmail author
  • Bing HanEmail author
Article
  • 16 Downloads

Abstract

The indium tin oxide (ITO) film is one of the ideal candidates for optical transparent film strain gauge. Thus, the temperature stability of electrical properties is most important for ITO film strain gauge. In this work, the film strain gauge consisted of polycrystalline ITO film with and without (100) preferred orientation. Total 25 temperature circles in range of 20–200–20 °C were carried out on ITO film and ITO film strain gauge. After 25 temperature circles, the carrier concentration and carrier mobility of polycrystalline ITO film without preferred orientation decreased (38.1 ± 1.7)% and (15.4 ± 3.3)%, respectively. Then, the resistivity of polycrystalline ITO film without preferred orientation increased (90.7 ± 6.4)% after 25 temperature circles. As result, the resistance of film strain gauge monotonously increased with the increase of temperature circles, which consisted of the polycrystalline ITO film without preferred orientation. On the contrary, the carrier mobility and carrier concentration of polycrystalline ITO film with (100) preferred orientation was fixed at the constant after each temperature circle. Similarly, the resistivity of ITO film and the resistance of ITO restrain gauge was fixed at the constant after each temperature circle, which consisted of the polycrystalline ITO film with (100) preferred orientation. Finally, based on the theories of film growth and crystallography, the relationship between resistance temperature stability of ITO film strain gauge and (100) preferred orientation, as well as the physicochemical mechanism behind them, were systematically investigated. With above results, ITO film with (100) preferred orientation could be an ideal candidate for optical transparent film strain gauge, especially for film strain gauge worked at variable temperature condition.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51472039/51772038/51575074/61504017), Project of Dalian Youth Star of Science and Technology (Grant No. 2015R071), Liaoning BaiQianWan Talents Program, Natural Science Foundation of Liaoning Province, China (Grant Nos. 2015020182/191/653, 201602120), Project Sponsored by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Doctor, Liaoning Province, China (Grant No. 201601248), and Liaoning Province Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Equipment and Process Control, University of Science and Technology Liaoning.

Supplementary material

10854_2018_431_MOESM1_ESM.docx (822 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 822 KB)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Dalian Jiaotong UniversityDalianChina
  2. 2.Liaoning Province Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Equipment and Process ControlUniversity of Science and Technology LiaoningAnshanChina
  3. 3.College of Materials Science and EngineeringDalian Jiaotong UniversityDalianChina
  4. 4.College of Mechanical Engineering & AutomationUniversity of Science and Technology LiaoningAnshanChina

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