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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 55, Issue 1, pp 1–23 | Cite as

Review of experimental and modelling developments for ceria-based solid oxide fuel cells free from internal short circuits

  • Yihan LingEmail author
  • Xinxin Wang
  • Zhenkai Ma
  • Kangwei Wei
  • Yujie Wu
  • Majid Khan
  • Keqing Zheng
  • Shuanglin Shen
  • Shaorong Wang
Review

Abstract

Ceria-based solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are the promising candidates for the low- and intermediate-temperature SOFCs. However, the Ce4+ in the ceria-based electrolyte materials is likely reduced to Ce3+ under low oxygen partial pressure, leading to high electronic conductivity. Therefore, ceria-based SOFCs commonly show low open-circuit voltage and low efficiency due to the leakage current. While extensive studies of the electron transport mechanism and the methods for the prevention of leakage current in ceria-based electrolytes have been conducted, systematic reviews of the relevant literature have been notably rare. In this review, the formation mechanism and factors affecting electronic conductivity in doped ceria are clearly described. Additionally, two kinds of methods including the optimization of the single ceria-doped electrolyte and the use of the various electron blocking layers (e.g., ZrO2-based, doped BaCeO3/SrCeO3 and doped Bi2O3 materials) are systematically summarized. Finally, mathematical models describing the electrochemical characteristics of ceria-based SOFCs based on different assumptions are reviewed. This review can provide useful guidance for the further development and application of internal short-circuit-free ceria-based SOFCs.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (2017BSCXA03).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declared that they have no financial and personal relationships with other people or organizations that can inappropriately influence their work.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Materials Science and EngineeringChina University of Mining and TechnologyXuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Key Laboratory of Gas and Fire Control for Coal Mines (Ministry of Education)China University of Mining and TechnologyXuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  3. 3.Jiangsu Province Engineering Laboratory of High Efficient Energy Storage Technology and EquipmentsChina University of Mining and TechnologyXuzhouPeople’s Republic of China
  4. 4.Department of PhysicsAbdul Wali Khan University MardanMardanPakistan

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