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Highly thermally conductive graphene film produced using glucose under low-temperature thermal annealing

  • Jing LiEmail author
  • Xu-Yang Chen
  • Ru-Bai Lei
  • Jin-Feng Lai
  • Tong-Mei Ma
  • Yang LiEmail author
Chemical routes to materials

Abstract

Graphene films have attracted much attention as a heat dissipation material due to their unique thermal transfer behavior that exceeds that the performance of graphite. However, the very high thermal annealing temperature (~ 3000 °C) required to reduce the graphene oxide (GO) films leads to high manufacturing costs and restricts its broader application in thermal management applications. In this study, a modified-graphene (m-Gr) film was fabricated by vacuum-filtering GO suspensions with added glucose, followed by thermal annealing at 1000 °C. Oxygen-containing functional groups were effectively eliminated during annealing and activated carbon atoms from the decomposition of glucose molecules repaired defects in the graphene sheets to restore large areas of the π-conjugated structure. The as-obtained m-Gr films showed excellent in-plane thermal conductivity ~ 1300 Wm−1 K−1 and much more efficient heat removal than pristine-reduced graphene oxide films. This high thermal conductivity of m-Gr films provides opportunities for their use in next-generation commercial electronics.

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge financial support by the “13th Five-Year Plan” Civil Aerospace Technology Pre-Research Project of the State Administration of Science, Technology, and Industry for National Defense (501-01-2018-0167, A2180150); the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (D2175010); and the Joint Fund for Equipment Pre-Research of Ministry of Education of China (6141A02022520).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10853_2019_3406_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (750 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 750 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Chemistry and Chemical EngineeringSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina
  2. 2.South China University of Technology-Zhuhai Institute of Modern Industrial InnovationZhuhaiChina
  3. 3.School of Mechanical and Automotive EngineeringSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina

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