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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 44, Issue 4, pp 1137–1139 | Cite as

Carbonaceous adsorbents produced from coffee lees

  • Yutaka KawaharaEmail author
  • Kazuyoshi Yamamoto
  • Hiroyuki Wakisaka
  • Kaori Izutsu
  • Masatoshi Shioya
  • Toshiaki Sakai
  • Yutaka Takahara
  • Noboru Ishibashi
Letter

Carbons derived through thermal decomposition of natural products usually showed a texture reflecting the original structure of the starting material such as the cellular structure. The present authors have been studying structure and properties of carbons derived from various natural products [1, 2, 3]. It has been found that the charcoal derived from ground coffee lees showed a peculiar texture with pock mark and showed an excellent gas-phase adsorption of toluene, and that the activated carbon (AC) derived from the coffee lees-based charcoal showed an excellent liquid-phase adsorption of 2-methylisoborneol (2-MIB).

Benzene, toluene, xylene are the harmful volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and the removal of such VOCs from emission stream is recently of considerable interest. Adachi et al. [4] have investigated the adsorption behavior of coffee lees waste and have reported that the spherosome fraction contained can adsorb benzene efficiently. In the present paper, however, we use...

Keywords

Activate Carbon Charcoal Activate Carbon Powder Adsorption Test Geosmin 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yutaka Kawahara
    • 1
    Email author
  • Kazuyoshi Yamamoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroyuki Wakisaka
    • 3
  • Kaori Izutsu
    • 4
  • Masatoshi Shioya
    • 5
  • Toshiaki Sakai
    • 4
  • Yutaka Takahara
    • 4
  • Noboru Ishibashi
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Biological & Chemical EngineeringGunma UniversityKiryuJapan
  2. 2.Research Lab., Carbo-tec. Co. LtdKamigyo-ku, KyotoJapan
  3. 3.North Eastern Industrial Research Center of Shiga PrefectureNagahamaJapan
  4. 4.Central Laboratory, Awa Paper MFG. Co. LtdTokushima-shiJapan
  5. 5.Department of Organic and Polymeric MaterialsTokyo Institute of TechnologyTokyoJapan

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