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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 122–128 | Cite as

Sol-gel synthesis of alumina, titania and mixed alumina/titania in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulphonyl) amide

  • Hala K. Farag
  • Mohammad Al Zoubi
  • Frank Endres
Article

Abstract

In this paper we report on the synthesis of alumina, titania and mixed alumina–titania in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulphonyl) amide [Py1,4]TFSA via sol-gel methods using aluminium isopropoxide and titanium isopropoxide as precursors. Our results show that the as-synthesized alumina is mainly mesoporous boehmite with an average pore diameter of 3.8 nm. The obtained boehmite is subject to a phase transformation into γ-Al2O3 and δ-Al2O3 after calcinations at 800 and 1,000 °C, respectively. The as-synthesized TiO2 shows amorphous behaviour and calcination at 400 °C yields anatase which undergoes a further transformation to rutile at 800 °C. The as-prepared alumina–titania powders are amorphous and transformed to rutile and α-Al2O3 after calcination at 1,000 °C TiO2. The obtained alumina–titania has a higher surface area than those of alumina or titania. The surface area of the as-synthesized alumina–titania was found to exceed 486 m2 g−1, whereas the surface areas of the as-synthesized boehmite and titania were around 100 m2 g−1, respectively.

Keywords

Ionic Liquid Rutile Boehmite Anatase Phase Differential Thermal Analysis Curve 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank Prof. Dr Markus Antonietti, Max-Plank Institute, Potsdam, Germany, for gas sorption measurements and valuable advices.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hala K. Farag
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohammad Al Zoubi
    • 1
  • Frank Endres
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Particle TechnologyClausthal University of TechnologyClausthal-ZellerfeldGermany
  2. 2.Inorganic Chemistry DepartmentNational Research CentreDokki, CairoEgypt

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