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Journal of Materials Science

, Volume 41, Issue 21, pp 7240–7246 | Cite as

High temperature, spectral-directional emittance of high purity nickel oxidized in air

  • George Teodorescu
  • Peter D. Jones
  • Ruel A. Overfelt
  • Baojian Guo
Article

Abstract

Spectral-directional emittance measurements for 99.99% nickel, thermally oxidized in air, were performed at temperatures of 673, 773, and 873 K using an apparatus comprised of a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer, a blackbody radiating cavity (hohlraum), and a sample holder which allows directional measurements. The data cover the spectral range between 2 and 20 μm, and the directional range from a surface normal to 72° polar angle. The Ni sample had a nominal surface roughness of 4.1 μm and was heated for 1 h at the measurement temperatures prior to emission measurements. X-ray diffraction and EDS analyses were performed in order to characterize the sample surface. It was found that the normal emittance of oxidized nickel increases with temperature for the temperature range considered. Directional emittance shows slightly departure from pure metal behavior.

Keywords

Emissivity Nickel Oxide Pure Nickel Radiation Heat Flux Blackbody Cavity 

Nomenclature

ελ

spectral emittance

Iλ

spectral intensity, W/ (mμm sr)

λ

wavelength, μm

T

temperature, K

k

direction vector

θ

polar angle

δε

emittance uncertainty

δT

temperature uncertainty, K

c2

second radiation constant, μm K

h

Planck’s constant, J s

c0

speed of light in vacuum, m/s

K

Boltzmann’s constant, J/K

Subscripts

b

blackbody

s

sample surface

r

surroundings visible to sample surface

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors gratefully acknowledge the financial support received from NASA’s Space Product Development Program at Marshall Space Flight Center under Cooperative Agreement No. NCC8–240.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • George Teodorescu
    • 1
  • Peter D. Jones
    • 2
  • Ruel A. Overfelt
    • 1
  • Baojian Guo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mechanical/Materials EngineeringAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA
  2. 2.Department of Mechanical EngineeringAuburn UniversityAuburnUSA

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