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Simple method for preserving large quantity of high viability red biomass of Haematococcus in the medium term (3~6 months)

  • Junfeng Wang
  • Weiwei Tang
  • Lin Chen
  • Wen Liu
  • Xin Gao
  • Tianzhong Liu
Article

Abstract

To preserve large quantity of biomass in high viability for medium-term time (3~6 months) is meaningful for large-scale cultivation of Haematococcus pluvialis. In this research, 8 preserving methods were designed and tested under room temperature (RT) as well as under sub-RT (10 °C). Results showed that the viability index for biomass that mixed with ten times volume of quartz sand and was preserved in dim light and sub-RT for 8 months was 67%, much higher than that of other methods. Other merits including simple operation, cheap and recyclable additive, and environmental friendly were also inherent characters for this method, indicating it was suitable for preserving kilogram level of biomass in high viability up to several months.

Keywords

Preservation Haematococcus pluvialis Red biomass Viability Quartz sand 

Notes

Funding information

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (grant number 2016YFB0601002) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (31572637).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Junfeng Wang
    • 1
  • Weiwei Tang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Lin Chen
    • 1
  • Wen Liu
    • 1
  • Xin Gao
    • 2
  • Tianzhong Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.Key Laboratory of Biofuels, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess TechnologyChinese Academy of SciencesQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China
  2. 2.Laboratory of Seaweed Chemistry and Applied Research, College of Food Science and EngineeringOcean University of ChinaQingdaoPeople’s Republic of China

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