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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 49, Issue 12, pp 4847–4861 | Cite as

Increasing Verbal Interaction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Audio Script Procedure

  • Cetin Topuz
  • Burcu Ulke-KurkcuogluEmail author
Original Paper

Abstract

This study aimed at investigating the effectiveness of audio script and script-fading procedure in teaching initiation to children with ASD. Three children with ASD and a parent of each child participated in the study. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline design across children was used. The findings showed that the initiation emitted by the children increased during audio script and script-fading procedure. Children also generalized initiation across different conditions and maintained the acquired skills. Finally, the social validity findings showed that the opinions of the parents regarding the procedure were overall positive. Results were discussed in terms of recommendations for practitioners and future research.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Script Script fading Communication skills Initiation 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We thank to our participants and their families for their participation and collaboration, Anadolu University for supporting the research and Mustafa Cakmak, Zulal Cakmak and Muhammet Yasin Yassıkaya for collecting reliability data. Also, we thank to Dinçer Saral for his contributions in the English writing process.

Funding

This research was funded by Anadolu University Committee of Scientific Research Projects (Project No: 1603E088). The views expressed in this article do not necessarily reflect those of Anadolu University Committee of Scientific Research Projects.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019
corrected publication 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Institute for Individuals with DisabilitiesAnadolu UniversityEskisehirTurkey

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