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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 49, Issue 8, pp 3440–3452 | Cite as

Applicability and Effectiveness of Social Competence Group Intervention on Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Chinese Context: A Community-Based Study with Self- and Parent-Report

  • Cecilia Nga Wing LeungEmail author
  • Raymond Won Shing Chan
  • Miko Yik Chui Yeung
  • Henry Chi Hang Tsui
Original Paper
  • 33 Downloads

Abstract

Social competence training for adults with ASD were limited in comparison to intervention for children or adolescents. CBT-CSCA is a culturally-sensitive social competence training specially developed for adolescents in Hong Kong. With its demonstrated effectiveness, the current study outlined the adaptions of its adult version, CBT-CSCA (Adult) and examined its treatment effectiveness. Thirty-six adults (aged 18–29 years, with a FSIQ above 80) completed the intervention. Significant improvements were shown in overall social competence, from both self- and parent-report, and negative mood. Participants also reported satisfactory knowledge gain and confidence in applying content learnt after each session. The study provided evidence support to the applicability and effectiveness of social competence training for adults with ASD in the Chinese culture.

Keywords

Autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) Social competence Adult CBT Chinese 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the Hong Kong Jockey Club Charities Trust for its financial support to the Jockey Club iREACH Social Competence Development and Employment Support Center, New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation Association. We would also like to thank Fan Mui Ying, Joe Chan, Doris Huang, Chris Lam and other colleagues for their valuable assistance on this study. We are grateful to the participants and families who participated.

Author Contributions

RC conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination. CL & MY developed the intervention protocol under the supervision of RC. HT wrote the first draft under the supervision of CL. CL & RC revised and finalized the manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cecilia Nga Wing Leung
    • 1
    Email author
  • Raymond Won Shing Chan
    • 1
  • Miko Yik Chui Yeung
    • 1
  • Henry Chi Hang Tsui
    • 1
  1. 1.The Jockey Club iREACH Social Competence Development and Employment Support Center, New Life Psychiatric Rehabilitation AssociationChai WanHong Kong

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