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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 49, Issue 12, pp 5100–5104 | Cite as

Recovery from Autism after Successful Surgery for a Benign Brain Tumor Associated with Epilepsy

  • Michal HrdlickaEmail author
  • Martin Kudr
  • Pavel Krsek
  • Michal Tichy
  • Martin Kyncl
  • Josef Zamecnik
  • Marketa Mohaplova
  • Iva Dudova
Letter to the Editor

Introduction

A rare example of syndromic autism is autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in children with brain tumors. The case reports on this association are few and mostly involve autism and cerebellar pilocytic astrocytoma (Omar et al. 2009; Adachi et al. 2012; Minhas et al. 2013), right temporal ganglioglioma (Mikati et al. 2009), and mesial temporal oligodendroglioma (Hoon and Reiss 1992). The majority of the described cases underwent neurosurgery for removal of the brain tumor (Adachi et al. 2012; Minhas et al. 2013; Mikati et al. 2009; Hoon and Reiss 1992). Following surgery, autism remained unchanged (Adachi et al. 2012), was minimally or mildly improved (Hoon and Reiss 1992; Mikati et al. 2009), or autism improvement was not specified (Minhas et al. 2013).

Case Report

A 3 year 9 month old boy was referred to the child psychiatry department for a diagnostic evaluation of neurodevelopmental delay with suspicion of autism. Speech development was significantly delayed; at the time of...

Notes

Acknowledgments

Supported by the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic (Grant no. 16-31754A and the Project for Conceptual Development of Research Organization 00064203, University Hospital Motol, Prague, Czech Republic), and by the Charles University (Progres Q15 program). The authors would like to thank Thomas Secrest, M.Sc. for his assistance with the English version of the manuscript.

Author Contributions

MH conceived the report. MH and MKu performed clinical examinations of the patient and drafted the manuscript; both authors contributed equally to the manuscript. PK assessed the patient, planned the neurosurgery, contributed to and commented on the drafts of the manuscript. MT performed the neurosurgery and contributed to the draft of the manuscript. MKy assessed the MRI scans and contributed to the draft of the manuscript. JZ assessed the histopathology of the tumor and contributed to the draft of the manuscript. MM and ID performed clinical examinations of the patient and commented on the drafts of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

The work on the article was supported by the Ministry of Health (Grant no. 16-31754A and the Project for Conceptual Development of Research Organization 00064203), and by the Progres Q15 program.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Author Michal Hrdlicka declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Martin Kudr declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Pavel Krsek declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Michal Tichy declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Martin Kyncl declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Josef Zamecnik declares that he has no conflict of interest. Author Marketa Mohaplova declares that she has no conflict of interest. Author Iva Dudova declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

This article does not contain any studies with human participants performed by any of the authors. Informed consent was obtained from parents of the reported child.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michal Hrdlicka
    • 1
    Email author
  • Martin Kudr
    • 2
  • Pavel Krsek
    • 2
  • Michal Tichy
    • 3
  • Martin Kyncl
    • 4
  • Josef Zamecnik
    • 5
  • Marketa Mohaplova
    • 1
  • Iva Dudova
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Child PsychiatryCharles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic
  2. 2.Department of Pediatric NeurologyCharles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic
  3. 3.Department of NeurosurgeryCharles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic
  4. 4.Department of RadiologyCharles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic
  5. 5.Department of Pathology and Molecular MedicineCharles University Second Faculty of Medicine and University Hospital MotolPragueCzech Republic

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