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Brief Report: Challenging Behaviors in Toddlers and Preschoolers with Angelman, Prader–Willi, and Williams Syndromes

  • Wei Siong Neo
  • Bridgette L. Tonnsen
Brief Report

Abstract

Children with neurogenetic syndromes (NGS) experience comorbid challenging behaviors and psychopathology. We examined challenging behaviors in 86 toddlers and preschoolers across three NGS [Angelman syndrome (AS), Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS), and Williams syndrome (WS)] and 43 low-risk controls (LRC), using the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1½–5. Challenging behavior profiles differed across NGS, with generally elevated behaviors in AS and WS, but not PWS, relative to LRC. Withdrawn and autism spectrum symptoms were particularly elevated in AS. Although several profiles were similar to those previously reported in older children and adults, we also observed inconsistencies that suggest non-linear developmental patterns of challenging behaviors. These findings underscore the importance of characterizing early challenging behaviors to inform atypical phenotypic development and targeted intervention.

Keywords

Challenging behavior Early childhood Angelman syndrome Prader–Willi syndrome Williams syndrome Child Behavior Checklist 

Notes

Author Contributions

WSN conceived of the study, participated in its design, performed the statistical analyses, interpreted the results, and drafted the manuscript; BLT conceived of the study, participated in its design, reviewed the statistical analyses, interpreted the results, and drafted the manuscript. Both authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychological SciencesPurdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

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