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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 49, Issue 2, pp 781–787 | Cite as

Brief Report: Examination of Sex-Based Differences in ASD Symptom Severity Among High-Functioning Children with ASD Using the SRS-2

  • Jonathan D. RodgersEmail author
  • Jennifer Lodi-Smith
  • James P. Donnelly
  • Christopher Lopata
  • Christin A. McDonald
  • Marcus L. Thomeer
  • Alanna M. Lipinski
  • Brian C. Nasca
  • Adam J. Booth
Brief Report

Abstract

Prior studies of sex-based differences in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have yielded mixed findings. This study examined ASD symptom severity and functional correlates in a sample of 34 high-functioning females with ASD (HFASD; M age = 8.93; M IQ = 104.64) compared to 34 matched males (M age = 8.96; M IQ = 104.44) using the Social Responsiveness Scale-Second Edition (SRS-2). Results identified non-significant and minimal differences (negligible-to-small) on the SRS-2 total, DSM-5 symptom subscale, and treatment subscale scores. Significant negative (moderate) correlations were found between the SRS-2 Social Cognition subscale and IQ and language scores and between the SRS-2 Social Motivation subscale and receptive language scores for females only; no significant correlations were found for males.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder High-functioning Sex-based differences Social Communication and Interaction Social Responsiveness Scale-Second Edition 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research reported in this article was supported by Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences Grants R324A130216 and R324A080136, United States Department of Defense Grant W81XWH-15-1-0195, and a research grant from the Peter and Elizabeth C. Tower Foundation. Findings and conclusions are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of the funding agencies.

Author Contributions

JDR conceived of the study, participated in its design, collected and coordinated the data, and drafted the manuscript; JLS contributed to the study design, conducted the statistical analyses, assisted in interpretation of the data, and contributed to manuscript preparation; JPD participated in the design, conducted the statistical analyses, and assisted in the interpretation of the data and preparation of the manuscript; CL participated in the study design and contributed to manuscript preparation; CAM participated in the study design, assisted with data coordination, and contributed to manuscript preparation; MLT participated in the study design and manuscript preparation; AML assisted in data collection, data management, and manuscript preparation; BCN assisted in data collection, data management, and manuscript preparation; AJB assisted in data collection, data management, and manuscript preparation. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan D. Rodgers
    • 1
    Email author
  • Jennifer Lodi-Smith
    • 1
  • James P. Donnelly
    • 1
  • Christopher Lopata
    • 1
  • Christin A. McDonald
    • 2
  • Marcus L. Thomeer
    • 1
  • Alanna M. Lipinski
    • 1
  • Brian C. Nasca
    • 2
  • Adam J. Booth
    • 1
  1. 1.Canisius CollegeInstitute for Autism ResearchBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Center for Autism Spectrum DisordersNationwide Children’s HospitalWestervilleUSA

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