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International Ophthalmology

, Volume 39, Issue 2, pp 491–495 | Cite as

Partial thickness sclerectomy to treat exudative retinal detachment secondary a submacular choroidal hemangioma in a Sturge–Weber syndrome

  • Barbara Parolini
  • Daniele Cardillo
  • Andrea Baldi
  • Attilio Di Salvatore
  • Alessandro Finzi
  • Sajish J. Pinackatt
  • Rino Frisina
  • Gianluca BesozziEmail author
Case Report
  • 113 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To demonstrate the safety and efficacy of partial thickness sclerectomies to treat exudative retinal detachment secondary to choroidal hemangioma, non-suitable with photodynamic therapy in a 5-year-old child with Sturge–Weber syndrome.

Methods

A 5 year-old child presented exudative retinal detachment secondary to choroidal subfoveal diffuse hemangioma. The child was non-compliant to undergo a photodynamic therapy. A partial thickness sclerectomy was made in each quadrant under general anesthesia.

Results

The retina was re-attached with improvement in vision from 20/400 to 20/80. Two years after primary surgery, the retinal detachment relapsed. Drainage of the subretinal fluid was obtained by the revision of the sclerectomies. After obtaining retinal reattachment, photodynamic therapy was applied to treat the hemangioma. No complications were reported after treatment.

Conclusion

Sclerectomies may be considered an efficient and safe surgical option for the management of exudative retinal detachment secondary to choroidal hemangioma in patients non-suitable for photodynamic therapy, waiting for photodynamic therapy to be practicable directly on the hemangioma.

Keywords

Choroidal hemangioma Exudative retinal detachment Retinal detachment Sclerectomy Sturge–Weber syndrome Photodynamic therapy 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Barbara Parolini
    • 1
  • Daniele Cardillo
    • 1
  • Andrea Baldi
    • 1
  • Attilio Di Salvatore
    • 1
  • Alessandro Finzi
    • 1
  • Sajish J. Pinackatt
    • 1
  • Rino Frisina
    • 2
  • Gianluca Besozzi
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.S. Anna Clinical InstituteBresciaItaly
  2. 2.Ophthalmology Unit, Department of Neurosciences DNSUniversity Hospital-Medical SchoolPaduaItaly

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