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International Ophthalmology

, Volume 39, Issue 9, pp 2023–2031 | Cite as

Anti-VEGF treatment switch in neovascular age-related macular degeneration: a comparison of aflibercept versus ranibizumab after a single-dose switch

  • Guillermo Salcedo-VillanuevaEmail author
  • Estephania Feria-Anzaldo
  • Juan C. Romo-Aguas
  • Andrés Lisker-Cervantes
  • Alejandra González-Dibildox
  • Edel Moreno-Paramo
  • Abraham A. Medina-Andrade
  • Raúl Velez-Montoya
  • Gerardo García-Aguirre
  • Virgilio Morales-Cantón
  • Hugo Quiroz-Mercado
Original Paper
  • 270 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the effect achieved from a single dose of anti-VEGF treatment switch, in patients with nAMD previously treated with bevacizumab, switched to either aflibercept or ranibizumab, and to compare the response between aflibercept and ranibizumab.

Methods

In retrospective, observational, and comparative study, patients were divided into two groups: Group 1, patients switched to aflibercept; Group 2, patients switched to ranibizumab. Paired samples t test was performed to measure differences in central macular thickness (CMT). To compare whether there were differences between groups mixed-design ANOVA was used.

Results

In Group 1, CMT changed from 360.51 to 260.16 µm, presenting a significant mean difference from PreSwitch to PostSwitch of 100.34 µm (p = 0.002, paired samples t test). In Group 2, CMT changed from 366.33 to 260.72 µm, showing a significant difference from PreSwitch to PostSwitch of 105.61 µm (p ≤ 0.000, paired samples t test). The mixed-design ANOVA compared both groups and resulted in a nonsignificant value of 0.90.

Conclusion

The effect achieved from a single dose in patients switched to aflibercept or ranibizumab reduced significantly CMT measurements. Comparing aflibercept and ranibizumab, the effect appears to be similar in both drugs, in terms of reduction of CMT.

Keywords

Aflibercept Bevacizumab Choroidal neovascularization Macular degeneration Ranibuzumab 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Guillermo Salcedo-Villanueva
    • 1
    Email author
  • Estephania Feria-Anzaldo
    • 1
  • Juan C. Romo-Aguas
    • 1
  • Andrés Lisker-Cervantes
    • 1
  • Alejandra González-Dibildox
    • 1
  • Edel Moreno-Paramo
    • 1
  • Abraham A. Medina-Andrade
    • 1
  • Raúl Velez-Montoya
    • 1
  • Gerardo García-Aguirre
    • 1
  • Virgilio Morales-Cantón
    • 1
  • Hugo Quiroz-Mercado
    • 2
  1. 1.Retina Department, Asociación Para Evitar la Ceguera en MéxicoHospital Dr. Luis Sánchez BulnesMexico CityMexico
  2. 2.Research Department, Asociación Para Evitar la Ceguera en MéxicoHospital Dr. Luis Sánchez BulnesMexico CityMexico

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