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Sumatriptan protects against myocardial ischaemia–reperfusion injury by inhibition of inflammation in rat model

  • Mohammad Sheibani
  • Hedyeh Faghir-Ghanesefat
  • Saman Dehpour
  • Hedieh Keshavarz-Bahaghighat
  • Mohammad Reza Sepand
  • Mohammad Hossein Ghahremani
  • Yaser Azizi
  • Nastaran Rahimi
  • Ahmad Reza DehpourEmail author
Original Article
  • 39 Downloads

Abstract

Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death on a global scale, placing major socio-economic burdens on health systems worldwide. Myocardial ischaemia and reperfusion (I/R)-induced tissue injury is associated with alteration in activity of inflammatory system and nitric oxide pathway. Sumatriptan, which is mainly used to relieve migraine headache, has recently been shown to exert anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we aimed to assess the possible cardioprotective effect of sumatriptan in a rat model of I/R injury. Male Wistar rats were subjected to 30-min ligation of left anterior descending coronary artery and 120-min reperfusion. Animals were randomly divided into five groups: (1) Sham (2) I/R (3) I/R treated with sumatriptan (0.3 mg/kg i.p.) 20 min after induction of I/R rats, (4) GR127935 (a selective antagonist of 5-HT1B/D serotonin receptors; 0.3 mg/kg) 20 min after induction of I/R, and (5) GR127935 (0.3 mg/kg) 15 min before administration of sumatriptan. Post-infarct treatment with sumatriptan increased left ventricular function, which was damaged in I/R animal’s heart. Sumatriptan (0.3 mg/kg) decreased lipid peroxidation, CK-MB and lactate dehydrogenase levels; tumor necrosis factor concentration; and Nf-ҡB’ protein production. Treatment with sumatriptan significantly increased the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression consequences nitric oxide metabolites’ level in I/R rats. Also, injection of sumatriptan remarkably decreased myocardial tissue injury assessed by histopathological study. These findings suggest that sumatriptan may attenuate I/R injury via modulating the inflammatory responses and endothelial NOS activity. But therapeutic index of sumatriptan is narrow according to the result of this study.

Keywords

Sumatriptan ischaemia/reperfusion Cardioprotective Inflammation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study was funded by Experimental Medicine Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; grant no. 97-01-158-37318, and by a grant (96002757) from Iran National Science Foundation (INSF).

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohammad Sheibani
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hedyeh Faghir-Ghanesefat
    • 1
    • 2
  • Saman Dehpour
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hedieh Keshavarz-Bahaghighat
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mohammad Reza Sepand
    • 3
  • Mohammad Hossein Ghahremani
    • 3
  • Yaser Azizi
    • 4
  • Nastaran Rahimi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Ahmad Reza Dehpour
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacology, School of MedicineTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  2. 2.Experimental Medicine Research CenterTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  3. 3.Department of Toxicology and Pharmacology, Faculty of PharmacyTehran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran
  4. 4.Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, Physiology Research CenterIran University of Medical SciencesTehranIran

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