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Voice signal processing for detecting possible early signs of Parkinson’s disease in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

  • Achraf BenbaEmail author
  • Abdelilah Jilbab
  • Sara Sandabad
  • Ahmed Hammouch
Article
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Abstract

In this study we introduced a method for early detecting of Parkinson’s disease (PD) in patients with rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder (RBD). Patients suffering from RBD are at extremely high risk (> 80%) for developing PD as well as other related neurodegenerative disorders. The database used in this study contains 30 PD patients in the very early stages, 50 RBD patient and 50 healthy subjects (HS). First, we created a model with a maximal accuracy of 85% of discrimination between PD and HS by testing different combinations of acoustic features along with different kernels of SVM and leave one subject out validation scheme. Based on that model, we tested 50 RBD patients in order to see whether they will belong to PD or HS groups. As a result we found 66% of RBD patients were classified as PD. Based on these foundlings we confirmed the existence of a correlation between RBD patients and early PD patients using speech analysis and thus, early PD signs can be reliably captured. These results will lead to the development of an embedded system for detecting the possible early signs of PD and other neurodegenerative diseases.

Keywords

Signal processing Speech analysis Parkinson’s disease Classification Cross validation 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical approval

All procedures followed were in accordance with the ethical standards of the responsible committee on human experimentation (institutional and national) and with the Helsinki Declaration of 1975, as revised in 2008 (5).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Achraf Benba
    • 1
    Email author
  • Abdelilah Jilbab
    • 1
  • Sara Sandabad
    • 2
  • Ahmed Hammouch
    • 1
  1. 1.Electronic Systems, Sensors and Nanobiotechnologies (E2SN)ENSET, Mohammed V University in RabatRabatMorocco
  2. 2.Laboratory of Control and Mechanical Characterization of Materials and Structures, National Higher School of Electricity and Mechanics (ENSEM)Hassan II University of CasablancaCasablancaMorocco

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