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Experimental and Numerical Simulation to Investigate the Effects of Membrane Fouling on the Heat and Mass Transfer

  • Boran YangEmail author
  • Haiping Chen
  • Chao Ye
  • Xiangsheng Li
  • Yijun Feng
Article
  • 143 Downloads

Abstract

Nanoporous tubular ceramic membranes (TCMs) are commonly used to extract water vapor and to recover latent heat from flue gas in thermal power plants. Water vapor condenses on the surface of the outer wall of the TCM, and the generated condensate permeates the membrane and flows along with the coolant water within the membrane. With time and use, fouling cakes will gradually accumulate and adhere on the inner surface of the membrane wall because of different kinds of soluble salts in the coolant water, which have negative effects on the water recovery performance of the membrane. This paper describes experiments to analyze the effect of membrane use times (0 h, 400 h and 800 h) on fouling cakes. The water recovery performance of the membrane with different use times is investigated experimentally and numerically using the commercial software FLUENT 14.5. Lastly, we evaluate the significance of multiple operational conditions on the water recovery process of ceramic membranes by using an ANOVA based on both the experimental and numerical results. The results showed that the water recovery rate of the membrane decreased by a maximum of 76.3 % when its use time reached 800 h. Furthermore, the original water vapor content of the gas plays a more critical role on the water recovery process compared to other operational parameters.

Keywords

Ceramic nanoporous membrane CFD simulation Experiment Fouling cake Heat and mass transfer 

List of symbols

Notations

A

Area of cells in the near-wall region (m2)

V

Volume of cells in the near-wall region (m3)

P

Static pressure (Pa)

T

Temperature (K)

r

Radius (m)

U

velocity magnitude (m·s−1)

D

Diffusion coefficient (m2·s−1)

S

Source term

l

Length of the ceramic tube (m)

t

Time step (s)

Δt

Using time (h)

M

Mass content (kg)

m

Mass flux (kg·m−2·s−1)

Kn

Kuhn number

h

Convective heat transfer coefficient (W·m−2·K−1)

q

Heat flux (kJ·m−2·s−1)

x

Distance along the ceramic tube (mm)

kB

Boltzmann constant

k0

Permeability coefficient

W

Mass fraction

Subscripts

mass

Continuity equation

m

Membrane

vap

Vapor

non

Noncondensable gas

sat

Saturated state of flow

species

Species conversation equation

enr

Energy conversation equation

rec

Water recovery

a

Average

b

Bulk

c

Coolant water

f

Fouling cake

wall

Near-wall region

0

Original state

Greek letters

ρ

Density (kg·m−3)

τ

Tortuosity of pores

γ

Latent heat (kJ·kg−1)

ε

Dissipation rate

k

Turbulent kinetic energy

λ

Thermal conductivity (W·m−1·K−1)

µ

Dynamic viscosity (Pa·s−1)

σ

Characteristic size of the gas mixture (nm)

Φ

Porosity

f

Friction factor for ceramic tubes

δ

Diffusion layer thickness

φ

Suction effect coefficient

Notes

Funding

The authors are grateful for the supports of “Nation Key R&D Program of China” (Grant No. 2018YFB0604302).

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Human and Animal Rights

This article does not contain any studies performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Energy, Power and Mechanical Engineering, National Thermal Power Engineering and Technology Research CenterNorth China Electric Power UniversityBeijingChina

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