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Becoming “Rebels” and “Idolaters” in the Valley of Volcanoes, Southern Peru

  • Alexander MenakerEmail author
Article
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Abstract

In the mid-eighteenth century around the town of Andagua in the high Southern Peruvian Andes, local indigenous residents nearly incited a rebellion rejecting regional authorities from Arequipa with ancestor cults as a locus of resistance. Subsequently, colonial officials burned ancestral mummies, in attempts to eradicate Andean religious beliefs and practices. Through the use of multiple methods and an archaeological perspective, this article examines how residents became “rebels and idolaters.” Challenging the universal subject and recognizing how subjectivities are historical and particular, I review how identities emerge through the production of places, forming relationships with the landscape across time and space.

Keywords

Rebellion Colonialism Ritual Labor Landscape Power Andes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The research was by the National Science Foundation (NSF-DDRIG – SBE, BCS–1540610) and the Department of Anthropology at UT-Austin. Special thanks to Scotti Norman and Sarah Kennedy for organizing the SAA session and volume and reviewers’ comments on the drafts. This work is grateful to a range of additional people and institutions, including but not limited to, the University Nacional de San Agustín, Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru, Ministry of Culture – Lima and Arequipa, Archbishop Archive of Arequipa, University of Texas-Austin, Zach Chase, Zev Cossin, Alan Covey, Maria Franklin, Victor Julljuye, Ali Lazaro, Blaise Murphy, Felix Palacios, Frank Salomon, Lucio Taco, Yukyko Takahashi, Steve Wernke. A deep thank you to co-director Victor Falcón Huayta, Kevin Ricci Jarra and all of the members of the Proyecto Arqueológico del Valle de Andagua. A sincere gratitude and indebtedness is owed to the community and municipality of Andagua, the Taco family, and my family. All errors are my own.

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Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropologythe University of Texas at AustinAustinUSA

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