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The Pluralistic Concept of the Life-World and the Various Fields of the Phenomenology of the Life-World in Husserl

  • Nam-In LeeEmail author
Article

Abstract

The life-world is a central topic of Husserl’s phenomenology. He addresses this issue in some of the works published during his lifetime and attempts to analyze the life-world extensively in many of his works and posthumously published research manuscripts. The life-world is one of the topics that have been discussed most extensively in phenomenology. However, there are many misunderstandings of Husserl’s phenomenology of the life-world. One misunderstanding concerns the variety of concepts of the life-world in Husserl and the possibility of developing various fields of the phenomenology of the life-world. It is the aim of this paper to show that Husserl has a pluralistic concept of the life-world, which makes it possible to develop various fields of the phenomenology of the life-world. I will introduce the monistic view and the pluralistic view of the concept of the life-world in Husserl and will clarify what the life-world is, thereby showing that the monistic view of the concept of the life-world in Husserl is not legitimate. However, even though Husserl has a pluralistic concept of the life-world, nowhere does he systematically clarify the various concepts of the life-world. Hence I will sort out and clarify various concepts of the life-world such as the narrower concept and the wider concept, the general concept and the particular concept, the natural concept and the transcendental concept, and the empirical concept and the eidetic concept. Based on the discussion of the various concepts of the life-world in Husserl, I will assess the monistic view and the pluralistic view of Husserl’s concept of the life-world so that we can better understand his various concepts of the life-world.

Notes

Acknowledgements

This paper was presented at the meeting of the German Society for Phenomenological Research that took place on September 18–21, 2019 at the University of Vienna in Austria. I thank Professor Christian Bermes and Professor Georg Stenger for their kind invitation to the conference. An earlier Korean version was presented at the seventh conference of the International Center for Applied Phenomenology (ICAP) that took place on August 24, 2019 at Seoul National University in South Korea. I will also present this paper at a colloquium to take place on November 15, 2019, at Sun Yat-sen University in Guangzhou, China. I thank Professor Wei Zhang for his kind invitation to the colloquium. This work was supported by the Global Research Network program through the Ministry of Education of the Republic of Korea and the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF-2017S1A2A2039388).

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© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhilosophySeoul National UniversityKwanak-Gu, SeoulRepublic of Korea

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