Advertisement

Zahavi, Dan: Husserl’s Legacy: Phenomenology, Metaphysics, and Transcendental Philosophy

Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2017. ISBN 978-0-19-968483-0, 236 + ix pp., US $41 (hardbound), US $37 (e-book), € 30, € 28 (e-book)
  • John J. DrummondEmail author
Book review

Over the past twenty-five years, Dan Zahavi has established himself as a foremost interpreter of Edmund Husserl’s phenomenology and a leading contributor to the development of contemporary phenomenology. He is renowned for showing that phenomenology is a viable and valuable alternative for addressing contemporary controversies in the philosophy of mind, the cognitive sciences, and social ontology and epistemology. Both facets of his work are on display in Husserl’s Legacy. Zahavi addresses the nature and significance of Husserl’s transcendental idealism and aims “to clarify Husserl’s position and to suggest ways in which to make sense of various central claims of his” (p. 3). His aim is neither to provide a full-throated defense of a phenomenological transcendental idealism nor to construct knockdown arguments against competing philosophical positions. He purports instead to offer a “proof-is-in-the-pudding” demonstration of transcendental idealism’s continuing relevance for...

Notes

References

  1. Carr, D. 1999. The paradox of subjectivity: The self in the transcendental tradition. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Crane, T. 2001. Elements of mind: An introduction to the philosophy of mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Crane, T. 2013. The objects of thought. Oxford: Oxford University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Crowell, S. G. 2001. Husserl, Heidegger, and the space of meaning: Paths toward transcendental phenomenology. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Drummond, J. J. 1990. Husserlian intentionality and non-foundational realism: Noema and object. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Drummond, J. J. (2003). The structure of intentionality. In D. Welton (Ed.), The new Husserl: A critical reader (pp. 65–92). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Drummond, J. J. 2009. La limitation de l’ontologie par la logique. C. Majolino (Trans.). Methodos 9: 16–38. https://journals.openedition.org/methodos/2131.
  8. Drummond, J. J. 2012. Intentionality without representationalism. In D. Zahavi (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of contemporary phenomenology (pp. 115–133). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Drummond, J. J. 2018. Husserl’s middle period and the development of his ethics. In D. Zahavi (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of the history of phenomenology (pp. 135–154). Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Heidegger, M. 1967. Sein und Zeit (11th ed.). Tübingen: Max Niemeyer; Being and time, J. Stambaugh and D. J. Schmidt (Trans.). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 2010.Google Scholar
  11. Hua III/1. Husserl, E. 1995. Ideen zu einer reinen Phänomenologie und phänomenologischen Philosophie. Erstes Buch, Allgemeine Einführung in die reine Phänomenologie. In K. Schuhmann (Ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff; Ideas for a pure phenomenology and phenomenological philosophy. First book: General introduction to pure phenomenology. D. O. Dahlstrom (Trans.). Indianapolis, IN: Hackett Publishing Company, 2014.Google Scholar
  12. Hua IX. Husserl, E. 1968. Phänomenologische Psychologie: Vorlesungen Sommersemester 1925. W. Biemel (Ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  13. Hua XIX/1. Husserl, E. 1984. Logische Untersuchungen. Zweiter Band, erster Teil: Untersuchungen zur Phänomenologie und Theorie der Erkenntnis. U. Panzer (Ed.). Husserliana XIX/1. The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff; Logical investigations. J. N. Findlay (Trans.). 2 vols. New York: Humanities Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  14. Hua XIX/2. Husserl, E. 1984. Logische Untersuchungen. Zweiter Band, zweiter Teil: Untersuchungen zur Phänomenologie und Theorie der Erkenntnis. U. Panzer (Ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff; Logical investigations. J. N. Findlay (Trans.). 2 vols. New York: Humanities Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  15. Hua XLII. Husserl, E. 2014. Grenzprobleme der Phänomenologie: Texte aus dem Nachlass (1908 - 1937). R. Sowa and Th. Vongehr (Eds.). Dordrecht: Springer.Google Scholar
  16. Hua XVII. Husserl, E. 1974. Formale und transzendentale Logik: Versuch einer Kritik der logischen Vernunft. P. Janssen (Ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff; Formal and transcendental logic. D. Cairns (Trans.). The Hague: Nijhoff, 1969.Google Scholar
  17. Hua XVIII. Husserl, E. 1975. Logische Untersuchungen. Erster Band: Prolegomena zur reinen Logik. E. Holenstein (Ed.). The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff; Logical investigations. J. N. Findlay (Trans.). 2 vols. New York: Humanities Press, 1970.Google Scholar
  18. Hua XXIV. Husserl, E. 1984. Einleitung in die Logik und Erkenntnistheorie: Vorlesungen 1906/07. U. Melle (Ed.). Dordrecht: Martinus Nijhoff.Google Scholar
  19. Hua XXXV. Husserl, E. 2002. Einleitung in die Philosophie: Vorlesungen 1922/23. B. Goossens (Ed.). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  20. Hua XXXVI. Husserl, E. 2003. Transzendentaler Idealismus: Texte aus dem Nachlass (1908-1921). R. D. Rollinger and R. Sowa (Eds.). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers.Google Scholar
  21. Sankey, H. 2008. Scientific Realism and the Rationality of Science. Aldershot: Ashgate.Google Scholar
  22. Searle, J. R. 1983. Intentionality: An essay in the philosophy of mind. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Thomasson, A. L. 2007. In what sense is phenomenology transcendental? The Southern Journal of Philosophy, 45(Suppl), 85–92.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Williams, B. 2005. Descartes: The project of pure enquiry. London: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Fordham UniversityBronxUSA

Personalised recommendations