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Stable expression and heredity of alien Glu-1Ssh in wheat-Aegilops sharonensis hybrid progenies

  • Xiaoyu Li
  • Qian Wang
  • Siyu Li
  • Jian Ma
  • Jirui Wang
  • Pengfei Qi
  • Guoyue Chen
  • Zhien Pu
  • Wei Li
  • Zongxiang Tang
  • Zehong Yan
  • Xiujin Lan
  • Mei Deng
  • Zhenxiang Lu
  • Yuming Wei
  • Youliang Zheng
  • Qiantao JiangEmail author
Research Article
  • 14 Downloads

Abstract

In our previous study, we have isolated novel HMW-GSs with unusually large molecular weight from Aegilops sharonensis; and to introduce this novel HMW-GSs variant into common wheat, we produced a number of amphiploids between various tetraploid wheat, hexaploid wheat and Ae. sharonensis by distant hybridization. In this study, we reported that the characterization of 24 HMW-GSs homozygous lines from wheat-Ae. sharonensis populations derived by continuous backcross or self-cross to common wheat cultivar LM3, which possessed homozygous HMW-GSs compositions including alien HMW-GS of Ae. sharonensis plus B and/or D genomes encoded HMW-GSs of LM3. According to the profiling of HMW-GS, these 24 homozygous lines can be summarized as four types. The results of Non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization (ND-FISH) indicated that the chromosome numbers of eight of 24 lines were 40, 42, 44 or 45, and the number of alien Ae. sharonensis Ssh were between two and eight. Three 1S(1A) substitution lines, two 1S(1B) substitution lines, three 1S(1D) substitution lines. For the four lines with 44 and 45 chromosomes, they exhibit novel cytogenetic characteristics in which the substitution of 1S(1B) or 1S(1D) and addition of Ae. sharonensis 3S or 4S simultaneously appeared. The 24 homozygous progenies were similar to common wheat LM3 on agronomic traits. Specially, four lines of them showed almost identical agronomic traits to recurrent parent common wheat LM3 than the rest lines. These homozygous progenies could be used not only to evaluate function on quality of single HMW-GS but also to create translocation lines.

Keywords

Aegilops sharonensis Distant hybridization Non-denaturing fluorescence in situ hybridization High-molecular-weight glutenin subunits Molecular markers 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFD0100900), the Key Research and Development Program of Sichuan Province (2018NZDZX0002), the Technological Innovation Project of Chengdu, Sichuan Province, China (2018-YF05-00059-SN), the Technology Foundation for Selected Overseas Chinese Scholars, Ministry of Personnel of China (No. 2014-4).

Author contributions

JQT conceived and designed research. LXY conducted experiments and wrote the manuscript. WQ and LSY contributed cross in the fields. MJ, QPF, LW, and PZE contribute to investigation of agronomic traits, CGY and WJR contributed to development of molecular marker, TZX and YZH assisted on FISH, LXJ and DM analyzed data, LZX, WYM and ZYL revised the manuscript. All authors read and approved the manuscript.

Supplementary material

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xiaoyu Li
    • 1
  • Qian Wang
    • 1
  • Siyu Li
    • 1
  • Jian Ma
    • 1
  • Jirui Wang
    • 1
  • Pengfei Qi
    • 1
  • Guoyue Chen
    • 1
  • Zhien Pu
    • 2
  • Wei Li
    • 2
  • Zongxiang Tang
    • 2
  • Zehong Yan
    • 1
  • Xiujin Lan
    • 1
  • Mei Deng
    • 1
  • Zhenxiang Lu
    • 3
  • Yuming Wei
    • 1
  • Youliang Zheng
    • 1
  • Qiantao Jiang
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Triticeae Research InstituteSichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina
  2. 2.College of AgronomySichuan Agricultural UniversityChengduChina
  3. 3.Lethbridge Research and Development CentreAgriculture and Agri-Food CanadaLethbridgeCanada

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