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Glass and Ceramics

, Volume 75, Issue 9–10, pp 383–386 | Cite as

Characteristics of the Structural State of Bismuth Ions in Bismuth-Borate Glasses

  • N. M. BobkovaEmail author
Article
  • 27 Downloads

The properties and graphical plots of the properties of bismuth-borate glasses in a wide range of compositions—20 to 80 mol.% Bi2O3 —are presented. In multi-bismuth glasses both the boron and bismuth ions are found in two coordination states: B3+, B4+ and Bi3+, Bi6+. The [BiO3] groups play the role of a conventional glass former but manifest weakly in the IR spectra.

Key words

lead-free low-melting glasses properties of bismuth-borate glasses structural role of Bi ions structure of bismuth-borate glasses 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Belarusian State Technological UniversityMinskBelarus

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