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Geotechnical and Geological Engineering

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 5349–5357 | Cite as

Discontinuity Nomenclature and Its Significance in Geotechnics

  • Yasemin LeventeliEmail author
  • Ozgur Yilmazer
  • Ilyas Yilmazer
Original Paper
  • 116 Downloads

Abstract

The trinity of the water-discontinuity-clay is the main cause behind most geotechnical problems involving rock slopes. The water molecule is unique to have a dipole property and is a common reactant in numerous chemical reactions. Discontinuity controls the slope stability. The planarity, continuity, and clay mineral infill are particularly important in the areas where outslope bedding dominates. The shear strength of clay mineral approaches zero upon saturation. The discontinuity nomenclature reduces the volume of the geomodel (GM) works, which comprise geology, hydrogeology, engineering geology, geoenvironment, and the geotechnics over 80%. The smectite-group clay minerals have a unit cell with net negative charge. Hence the water is readily captured by the electrically unbalanced mineral causing it to swell by more than 10% of its dry volume and then its shear strength approaches zero. The outsloping bedding, layering, or the basically imbricated thrust faults in places are the common examples of large-scale landslides. The discontinuity survey with the proposed nomenclature and approach is especially important in locating and orienting linear engineering structures. Consequently, this approach enhances the researchers and designers considerably in conducting projects conveniently in terms of timing, environment, safety/security and the cost.

Keywords

Water-discontinuity-clay Geomodel (GM) Landslide Contour map Geotechnics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors have been involved in international engineering projects since the 1990s. They appreciate colleagues who recognize the significance of experience in engineering geology accompanying with the principles of the basic sciences to erect innovative civil engineering projects in/on the ground. The financial support of the Scientific Research Projects Office of Akdeniz University is gratefully acknowledged.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Geological EngineeringAkdeniz UniversityAntalyaTurkey
  2. 2.Atac Engineering Limited CompanyAnkaraTurkey
  3. 3.Yılmazer Education and Engineering CompanyAnkaraTurkey

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