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Foundations of Science

, Volume 22, Issue 2, pp 421–424 | Cite as

How to Make Your Relationship Work? Aesthetic Relations with Technology

  • Jeannette PolsEmail author
Commentary

Abstract

Discussing the workings of technology in care as aesthetic rather than as ethical or epistemological interventions focusses on how technologies engage in and change relations between those involved. Such an aesthetic study opens up a repertoire to address values that are abundant in care, but are as yet hardly theorized. Kamphof studies the problem that sensor technology reveals things about the elderly patients without the patients being aware of this. I suggest improvement of these relations may be considered in aesthetic terms, for instance by developing the affective quality of people’s technological relationships.

Keywords

Aesthetics Technology Affective relations Ethics Health care 

References

  1. Daston, L., & Galison, P. (2007). Objectivity. Zone Books, 2007. http://waag.org/nl/project/scottie.
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  4. Pols, J., & Moser, I. (2009). Cold technologies versus warm care? On affective and social relations with and through care technologies. ALTER, 3, 159–178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Schermer, M. (2007). Noting but the truth? On truth and deception in dementia care. Bioethics, 21, 13–22.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2015

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made.

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Section of Medical EthicsAcademic Medical CentreAmsterdamNetherlands
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamNetherlands

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