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Euphytica

, 215:118 | Cite as

Phenotypic and molecular characterization of rice germplasm lines and identification of novel source for low soil phosphorus tolerance in rice

  • H. K. Mahadeva Swamy
  • M. Anila
  • Ravindra R. Kale
  • V. P. Bhadana
  • M. S. Anantha
  • P. Brajendra
  • S. K. Hajira
  • C. H. Balachiranjeevi
  • B. Laxmi Prasanna
  • K. Pranathi
  • T. Dilip
  • S. Bhaskar
  • V. Abhilash Kumar
  • M. B. V. N. Kousik
  • G. Harika
  • K. Swapnil
  • G. Rekha
  • C. Cheralu
  • V. Gouri Shankar
  • S. Narendra Reddy
  • Sudhir Kumar
  • S. M. Balachandran
  • M. S. Madhav
  • R. Mahendra Kumar
  • R. M. SundaramEmail author
Article
  • 34 Downloads

Abstract

Phosphorus (P) is an essential macro-nutrient required for growth and development of all crop plants including rice. Low availability of P in the soils manifests in terms of impeding crop growth leading to yield losses in rice. Adequate genetic variability for low soil P tolerance and also P use efficiency has been documented in rice and a major QTL called Pup1, conferring tolerance to low soil P has been identified, characterized and cloned from an Indian landrace, Kasalath. In the present study, a set of 98 germplasm lines collected from North-Eastern part of India were characterized for low soil P tolerance by screening them in a plot with low soil P (with available P < 2.0 kg ha−1) and also a plot with normal soil P (available P > 20 kg ha−1). The rice lines showed significantly high genetic variability for low soil P tolerance associated traits. Stress indices were estimated based on yield under normal and low soil P conditions and cluster analysis based on the stress indices; yield under normal and low soil P condition grouped the genotypes into highly tolerant, tolerant and sensitive to low soil P. Among the rice lines, 18 showed tolerance to low soil P (i.e. yield reduction < 70% in low soil P condition). The genotypic analysis based on Pup1 associated molecular markers revealed the presence of complete or partial Pup1 genomic region in most of the germplasm lines. Interestingly, a landrace called Wazuhophek was observed to be completely devoid of Pup1 and hence it can serve as novel source for low P tolerance.

Keywords

Low soil P tolerance Pup1 Germplasm Stress indices Wazuhophek 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors thank the Director, ICAR Indian Institute of Rice Research, for providing all the necessary facilities and Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India for funding.

Funding

The authors thank Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India, UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Grants Commission (Grant No. 2061230730) and Indian Council of Agricultural Research (ICAR) for the funding support. The support received from Director, ICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research (ICAR-IIRR) is also thankfully acknowledged.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Supplementary material

10681_2019_2443_MOESM1_ESM.ppt (568 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PPT 566 kb)
10681_2019_2443_MOESM2_ESM.doc (214 kb)
Supplementary material 2 (DOC 214 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • H. K. Mahadeva Swamy
    • 1
    • 3
    • 4
  • M. Anila
    • 1
  • Ravindra R. Kale
    • 1
    • 4
  • V. P. Bhadana
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. S. Anantha
    • 1
  • P. Brajendra
    • 1
  • S. K. Hajira
    • 1
  • C. H. Balachiranjeevi
    • 1
  • B. Laxmi Prasanna
    • 1
  • K. Pranathi
    • 1
  • T. Dilip
    • 1
  • S. Bhaskar
    • 1
  • V. Abhilash Kumar
    • 1
  • M. B. V. N. Kousik
    • 1
  • G. Harika
    • 1
  • K. Swapnil
    • 1
  • G. Rekha
    • 1
  • C. Cheralu
    • 4
  • V. Gouri Shankar
    • 4
  • S. Narendra Reddy
    • 4
  • Sudhir Kumar
    • 2
  • S. M. Balachandran
    • 1
  • M. S. Madhav
    • 1
  • R. Mahendra Kumar
    • 1
  • R. M. Sundaram
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Crop Improvement SectionICAR-Indian Institute of Rice Research (IIRR)Rajendranagar, HyderabadIndia
  2. 2.ICAR-Indian Institute of Agricultural Biotechnology (ICAR-IIAB)RanchiIndia
  3. 3.ICAR- Sugarcane Breeding Institute (SBI)CoimbatoreIndia
  4. 4.College of AgriculturePJTSAURajendranagar, HyderabadIndia

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