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Euphytica

, 215:112 | Cite as

Cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) mutants with reduced levels of palmitic acid (C16:0) in seed lipids

  • Corey N. Thompson
  • Bralie R. Hendon
  • Deepika Mishra
  • Jacob M. Rieff
  • Cindy C. Lowery
  • Kimberly C. Lambert
  • Travis W. Witt
  • Steven J. Oswalt
  • Efrem Bechere
  • C. Wayne Smith
  • Roy G. Cantrell
  • Brendan R. Kelly
  • Robert K. Imel-Vise
  • Kent D. Chapman
  • Michael K. Dowd
  • Dick L. AuldEmail author
Article
  • 68 Downloads

Abstract

The objective of this study was to identify mutants of upland cottonseed (Gossypium hirsutum L.) with reduced levels of palmitic acid (C16:0) in the seed. The five parental populations that had been exposed to Ethyl MethaneSulfonate in 1997 or 2002 were initially screened for either herbicide tolerance or divergent fiber quality. Fatty acid composition were determined for five seed bulks from 140 M5 mutant lines in 2009 and 100 M6 partial seeds in 2010. Mutants with reduced levels of palmitic acid levels were isolated from TAM 94L-25 (PI 631440), Acala 1517-99 (Reg. No. CV-115, PI 612326) and TTU SCM3-7-3 (Reg. No.GS-4, PI 657942). Thirteen M6 single seeds with reduced levels of palmitic acid (17.9–19.6%) were intercrossed in the greenhouse. Ten of the single seed selections were designated as potential male parents and randomly crossed to three potential female parents to generate F1 plants and 21 F2 populations for allele testing. Based on these tests, five F2 populations with reduced levels of low palmitic acid, were selected for further evaluation. The development of mutant lines with reduced levels of palmitic acid in upland cotton was submitted for proprietary protection under U.S. Patent No. 20160222399.

Keywords

Reduced levels of palmitic acid Fatty acid composition of cottonseed oil Chemical mutagenesis 

Abbreviations

C16:0

Palmitic acid

C18:0

Stearic acid

C18:1

Oleic acid

C18:2

Linoleic acid

Notes

Acknowledgements

Research supported for this work was provided by funding of Cotton Incorporated, the TTU Cotton Research Line of the USDA, the TTU Plant and Soil Science Department Rockwell Endowed Chair, and the TTU Office of Research Commercialization. Offsite chemical analyses was conducted at the USDA-ARS Southern Regional Research Center in New Orleans, LA and the Biodiversity Institute at the University of North Texas in Denton, TX. This research required 15 years and included the research efforts of 11 graduate students and six collaborating scientists scattered across the Southern U.S.A. Special thanks goes to Dr. Kater Hake, Vice President of Agricultural and Environmental Research at Cotton Incorporated, for providing coordination, moral support, and funding for this research team. “Mention of trade names or commercial products in this publication is solely for the purpose of providing specific information and does not imply recommendation or endorsement by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer”.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The reduced palmitic acid mutant identified in this study are protected by U.S. Patent Application No. 20160222399 (March 8, 2014) (Auld and Hendon 2016). Distribution of these lines will require permission of the Office of Research Commercialization at Texas Tech University, Box 42007, Lubbock, TX 79409 (806-742-4105).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Corey N. Thompson
    • 2
  • Bralie R. Hendon
    • 3
  • Deepika Mishra
    • 4
  • Jacob M. Rieff
    • 5
  • Cindy C. Lowery
    • 1
  • Kimberly C. Lambert
    • 6
  • Travis W. Witt
    • 7
  • Steven J. Oswalt
    • 2
  • Efrem Bechere
    • 8
  • C. Wayne Smith
    • 9
  • Roy G. Cantrell
    • 10
  • Brendan R. Kelly
    • 1
  • Robert K. Imel-Vise
    • 11
  • Kent D. Chapman
    • 12
  • Michael K. Dowd
    • 13
  • Dick L. Auld
    • 1
    • 14
    Email author
  1. 1.Plant and Soil Science DepartmentTexas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA
  2. 2.BASF-Plant ScienceLubbockUSA
  3. 3.School of Arts and SciencesUniversity of the SouthwestHobbsUSA
  4. 4.Arvegenix, Inc.St LouisUSA
  5. 5.Phytogen Seed Company LLCLubbockUSA
  6. 6.Centurion Pipe LinesLevellandUSA
  7. 7.Grazing Research LaboratoryUSDA-ARSEl RenoUSA
  8. 8.Crop Genetics Research UnitUSDA-ARSStonevilleUSA
  9. 9.Soil and Crop Science DepartmentTexas A&M UniversityCollege StationUSA
  10. 10.Wheelertex Consulting LLCLas CrucesUSA
  11. 11.Helena Agri-Enterprises, Inc.Big SpringUSA
  12. 12.Department of Biological SciencesUniversity of North TexasDentonUSA
  13. 13.Southern Regional Research CenterUSDA-ARSNew OrleansUSA
  14. 14.Rockwell Endowed Chair (Emeritus)Texas Tech UniversityLubbockUSA

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