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Variability in morphological traits of seedlings from five Euonymus japonicus cultivars

  • Cengiz Yucedag
  • Halil Baris Ozel
  • Mehmet CetinEmail author
  • Hakan Sevik
Article
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Abstract

In this study, we investigated the variability in morphological traits of seedlings from five Euonymus japonicus cultivars. We measured seedling heights, root collar diameters, leaf lengths and widths, root lengths, root numbers, and twig numbers of 60 seedlings from each cultivar. The E. japonicus cultivars Variegate and Green Rocket had the highest (95.8%) and lowest (70.3%) rooting percentages, respectively. With the exception of root lengths (p > 0.05), all morphological characteristics significantly differed among all cultivars (p < 0.05). In particular, the cultivar Green Rocket performed better than all other cultivars, with greater seedling heights and root collar diameters. These data warrant further studies for quantifying differences in traits among these cultivars.

Keywords

Euonymus japonicus Ornamental plant Landscape design Morphological traits Variability 

Notes

Author contributions

Mehmet and Hakan conceived and designed the experiments. Cengiz, Halil, Hakan, and Mehmet performed the experiments. Cengiz, Halil, and Mehmet analyzed the data. Cengiz, Mehmet, and Hakan contributed reagents/materials/analysis tools. Halil, Cengiz, and Mehmet wrote the paper.

Electronic supplementary material

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Cengiz Yucedag
    • 1
  • Halil Baris Ozel
    • 2
  • Mehmet Cetin
    • 3
    Email author
  • Hakan Sevik
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Landscape ArchitectureBurdur Mehmet Akif Ersoy UniversityBurdurTurkey
  2. 2.Faculty of Forestry, Department of Forest EngineeringBartin UniversityBartinTurkey
  3. 3.Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Landscape ArchitectureKastamonu UniversityKastamonuTurkey
  4. 4.Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Environmental EngineeringKastamonu UniversityKastamonuTurkey

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