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Age-dependent ingestion and inhalation doses due to intake of uranium and radon in water samples of Shiwalik Himalayas of Jammu and Kashmir, India

  • Manpreet Kaur
  • Ajay KumarEmail author
  • Rohit Mehra
  • Rosaline Mishra
Article
  • 7 Downloads

Abstract

The research work involved the ingestion and inhalation doses due to the intake of radon and uranium through water samples used by the inhabitants, measured in the villages of the Shiwalik Himalayas of Jammu and Kashmir, India. The uranium concentration in collected water samples was assessed by LED fluorimetric technique. All values of doses were found to be below the proposed limit of 100 μSv year−1 for all age categories except for infants due to the high-dose conversion factor. The annual effective doses for the various body organs due to the intake of radon was also calculated and found the maximum dose for lungs than other organs. The concentration of radon in water samples was assessed by Smart Rn Duo portable monitor and compared with RAD7. Statistical analysis was carried out and the Shapiro and Wilk (Biometrika, 52(3/4), 591–611, 1965) test has been also used for the distribution of the data. The physicochemical parameters were also measured in the collected water samples.

Keywords

Chemical toxicity Ingestion doses Radon Uranium Water sources 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors are profoundly grateful to the residents of Reasi district for their cooperation and help in the collection of water samples during field work. Special thanks are given to D.A.V. College, Amritsar and National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar, for their support in carrying out the experimental work.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflicts of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interests.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PhysicsDAV CollegeAmritsarIndia
  2. 2.Department of PhysicsNational institute of TechnologyJalandharIndia
  3. 3.Radiological Physics and Advisory DivisionBhabha Atomic Research CentreMumbaiIndia

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