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Cystic echinococcosis in unaccompanied minor refugees from Afghanistan and the Middle East to Germany, July 2016 through June 2017

  • Joachim RichterEmail author
  • Lars Esmann
  • Andreas K. Lindner
  • Isabel Trebesch
  • Gabriela Equihua-Martinez
  • Michaela Niebank
  • Susanne Georgi
  • Dirk Schürmann
  • Frieder Pfäfflin
  • Miralem Pasić
  • Maximilian Gertler
CORRESPONDENCE
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Abstract

Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is not covered by current refugee screening protocols. After we had detected CE among several refugees attending our clinic from Afghanistan and the Middle East, serological examinations for CE were performed for apparently healthy unaccompanied minor refugees from these regions.

Keywords

Echinococcus granulosus Cystic echinococcosis Refugees Afghanistan Middle East Syria Lebanon Iraq 

Notes

Acknowledgements

There was no specific financial support. The cases described have been observed in a clinical routine context. We would like to thank the patients and their guardians for their cooperation and support.

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joachim Richter
    • 1
    Email author
  • Lars Esmann
    • 2
  • Andreas K. Lindner
    • 1
  • Isabel Trebesch
    • 1
  • Gabriela Equihua-Martinez
    • 1
  • Michaela Niebank
    • 2
  • Susanne Georgi
    • 2
  • Dirk Schürmann
    • 2
  • Frieder Pfäfflin
    • 2
  • Miralem Pasić
    • 3
  • Maximilian Gertler
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Tropical Medicine and International HealthCharité UniversitätsmedizinBerlinGermany
  2. 2.Department of Infectious Diseases and Pulmonary MedicineCharité UniversitätsmedizinBerlinGermany
  3. 3.German Heart Center Berlin and DZHK (German Centre for Cardiovascular Research)Partner Site BerlinBerlinGermany

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