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Educational Studies in Mathematics

, Volume 100, Issue 1, pp 83–99 | Cite as

Relationships among prospective secondary mathematics teachers’ skills of attending, interpreting and responding to students’ understanding

  • Gloria Sánchez-MatamorosEmail author
  • Ceneida Fernández
  • Salvador Llinares
Article

Abstract

This study explores relationships among prospective secondary teachers’ skills of attending to relevant mathematics elements in students’ answers, interpreting students’ mathematical understanding, and proposing instructional actions. Thirty prospective secondary mathematics teachers analyzed three high school students’ answers to three problems of derivatives of a function at a given point and proposed instructional actions to help them progress in their understanding. Findings indicate that the more prospective teachers identified links between the mathematical elements and characteristics of students’ understanding, the more suitable the instructional activities were. Furthermore, our results suggest practical implications for teacher education programs since the type of task presented in this research may help to foster prospective secondary teachers’ noticing of students mathematical understanding.

Keywords

Derivative concept Noticing Prospective secondary teachers Prospective teacher education Students’ mathematical understanding 

Notes

Funding information

The research reported here was financed in part by Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia, Dirección General de Investigación, Spain, under Grant no. EDU2014-54526-R and EDU2017-87411-R, and in part by Generalitat Valenciana project no. GV/2015/115.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gloria Sánchez-Matamoros
    • 1
  • Ceneida Fernández
    • 2
  • Salvador Llinares
    • 2
  1. 1.Departamento Didáctica de las Matemáticas, Facultad de Ciencias de la EducaciónUniversidad de SevillaSevillaSpain
  2. 2.Departamento de Innovación y Formación Didáctica. Didáctica de la Matemática, Facultad de EducaciónUniversidad de AlicanteAlacanteSpain

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