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Ecotoxicology

, Volume 27, Issue 10, pp 1303–1309 | Cite as

Evaluation of the toxicity of leaches from hydrothermal sulfide deposits by means of a delayed fluorescence-based bioassay with the marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. NIES-981

  • Takahiro Yamagishi
  • Shigeshi Fuchida
  • Masakazu Katsumata
  • Yoshifumi Horie
  • Fumi Mori
  • Akiko Kitayama
  • Masanobu Kawachi
  • Hiroshi Koshikawa
  • Tatsuo Nozaki
  • Hidenori Kumagai
  • Jun-ichiro Ishibashi
  • Norihisa Tatarazako
Technical note

Abstract

The commercial use of metals such as copper, lead, and zinc has markedly increased in recent years, resulting in increased interest in deep-sea mining of seafloor hydrothermal sulfide deposits. However, the full extent of the impact of deep-sea mining at hydrothermal field deposits on the environment remains unclear. In addition to impacting the deep sea, the leaching of heavy metals from extracted sulfide mineral may also affect the upper ocean zones as the sulfide rock is retrieved from the seafloor. Here, we used a delayed fluorescence-based bioassay using the marine cyanobacterium Cyanobium sp. NIES-981 to evaluate the toxicity of three sulfide core samples obtained from three drill holes at the Izena Hole, middle Okinawa Trough, East China Sea. Leaches from two of the cores contained high concentrations of zinc and lead, and they markedly inhibited delayed fluorescence in Cyanobium sp. NIES-981 compared with control. By examining the toxicity of artificial mixed-metal solutions with metal compositions similar to those of the leaches, we confirmed that this inhibition was a result of high zinc and lead concentrations into the leaches. In addition, we conclude that this delayed fluorescence-based bioassay is a viable method for use by deep-sea mining operations because it is quicker and requires less laboratory space and equipment than the standard assay.

Keywards

Cyanobium sp. Deep-sea mining Delayed fluorescence Ecotoxicological bioassay Heavy metal 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We are grateful to Captain, OMI, OSI and other crew members of the CK16-05 Cruise (Exp. 909). We would like to thank the laboratory technicians of Marine Works Japan Ltd. for supporting our measurements on-board. This work was supported in part by the Japanese Council for Science, Technology, and Innovation Cross-ministerial Strategic Innovation Promotion Program, “Next-generation Technology for Ocean Resources Exploration.”

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takahiro Yamagishi
    • 1
  • Shigeshi Fuchida
    • 2
  • Masakazu Katsumata
    • 3
  • Yoshifumi Horie
    • 1
    • 4
  • Fumi Mori
    • 5
  • Akiko Kitayama
    • 5
  • Masanobu Kawachi
    • 5
  • Hiroshi Koshikawa
    • 2
  • Tatsuo Nozaki
    • 6
  • Hidenori Kumagai
    • 6
  • Jun-ichiro Ishibashi
    • 7
  • Norihisa Tatarazako
    • 1
    • 8
  1. 1.Research Center for Health and Environmental RiskNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  2. 2.Center for Regional Environmental ResearchNational Institute for Environmental StudiesTsukubaJapan
  3. 3.Central Research Laboratory, Hamamatsu Photonics K. K.ShizuokaJapan
  4. 4.Department of Biology EnvironmentAkita Prefectural UniversityAkitaJapan
  5. 5.Center for Environmental Biology and Ecosystem StudiesNational Institute for Environmental StudiesIbarakiJapan
  6. 6.Research and Development (R&D) Center for Submarine ResourcesJapan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC)YokosukaJapan
  7. 7.Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Faculty of SciencesKyushu UniversityNishi-kuJapan
  8. 8.Faculty of AgricultureEhime UniversityEhimeJapan

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