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Investigational New Drugs

, Volume 31, Issue 5, pp 1364–1366 | Cite as

Bronchoscopic findings for bevacizumab-related pulmonary hemorrhage in advanced non–small cell lung cancer

  • Kunio Okamoto
  • Isamu OkamotoEmail author
  • Masaki Miyazaki
  • Kaoru Tanaka
  • Hiroyasu Kaneda
  • Kazuhiko Nakagawa
SHORT REPORT

Summary

We report contemporaneous bronchoscopic findings for a case of bevacizumab-related pulmonary hemorrhage in a patient with advanced non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Flexible bronchoscopy at diagnosis revealed abnormal capillary dilation that was suggestive of endobronchial involvement at the primary tumor location. The patient developed massive hemoptysis despite of marked tumor shrinkage achieved by bevacizumab-containing chemotherapy. Emergency flexible bronchoscopy for hemoptysis suggested that the location of the primary tumor was the source of bleeding. Subsequent follow-up flexible bronchoscopy revealed an ulcerative mucosal-like lesion associated with a white necrotic substance as well as attenuation of the dilation of submucosal vessels compared with that apparent at diagnosis. Our case report highlights the potential mechanistic insights into bevacizumab-related bleeding and importance of performing bronchoscopy at diagnosis in NSCLC patients, given that abnormal bronchoscopic findings may be a risk factor for bleeding.

Keywords

Lung cancer Bevacizumab Pulmonary hemorrhage Bronchoscopy 

Notes

Authors’ disclosures of potential conflicts of interest

The author(s) indicated no potential conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kunio Okamoto
    • 1
  • Isamu Okamoto
    • 1
    Email author
  • Masaki Miyazaki
    • 1
  • Kaoru Tanaka
    • 1
  • Hiroyasu Kaneda
    • 1
  • Kazuhiko Nakagawa
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical OncologyKinki University Faculty of MedicineOsaka-SayamaJapan

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