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Foregone Inclusion: Neonatal CMV Hepatitis and Cholestasis

  • Melissa MartinEmail author
  • Signy Holmes
  • Jordan Sim
  • Maheen Hassan
  • Roshni Mathew
  • Rachel Bensen
  • Monique Barakat
Stanford Multidisciplinary Seminars
  • 16 Downloads

Case Presentation and Evolution

A two-month-old boy who had been born at 32-week gestation was initially evaluated by a community urgent care clinic with scleral icterus and mild respiratory distress. The patient’s mother reported that she had noted repeated waking and crying cycles over the previous several weeks. He also had frequent non-projectile “spit-ups” associated with feedings. His neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) course had been remarkable for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for 24 h after birth, total parenteral nutrition for approximately 20 days until he was transitioned to full enteral feeds, and phototherapy for 3 days for total bilirubin levels in the 7–8 mg/dL range. Serial head ultrasounds were notable for a tiny left-sided choroid plexus cyst. Of note, patient had failed his newborn hearing screen and was scheduled for repeat testing. He was discharged home from the NICU at 3 weeks of age. His standard newborn screening panel demonstrated elevated...

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Melissa Martin
    • 1
    Email author
  • Signy Holmes
    • 2
  • Jordan Sim
    • 3
  • Maheen Hassan
    • 1
  • Roshni Mathew
    • 4
  • Rachel Bensen
    • 1
  • Monique Barakat
    • 1
    • 5
  1. 1.Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and NutritionLucille Packard Children’s Hospital at StanfordStanfordUSA
  2. 2.Division of RadiologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  3. 3.Division of PathologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA
  4. 4.Division of Pediatric Infectious DiseasesLucille Packard Children’s Hospital at StanfordStanfordUSA
  5. 5.Division of Gastroenterology and HepatologyStanford University School of MedicineStanfordUSA

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