Antenatal Management for Women with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Experience from Our ‘IBD MOM’ Clinic

  • Ariella Bar-Gil Shitrit
  • Yael Cohen
  • Ori Hassin
  • Ami Ben Ya’acov
  • Rivkah Farkash
  • Benjamin Koslowsky
  • Yael Milgrom
  • Dan Meir Livovsky
  • Arnon Samueloff
  • Eran Goldin
  • Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky
Original Article
  • 31 Downloads

Abstract

Background

Inflammatory bowel disease affects women during their reproductive years and thus pregnancy outcomes. IBD MOM is a multidisciplinary, single-center clinic established to benefit women with IBD and their neonates.

Aim

The aim of this study was to evaluate the perinatal outcomes of the IBD MOM clinic patients compared to patients who attended antenatal and gastrointestinal disease community clinics (IBD CC).

Methods

This single-center, prospective study was conducted from 2011 to 2015. The primary outcome was cesarean delivery; secondary was adverse perinatal outcomes. In parallel, a new pregnancy-oriented, disease severity score was evaluated for its association with perinatal risk (score low = 0 to severe = 5).

Results

We identified 90 women in the IBD MOM clinic and 206 in the IBD CC. Maternal age, smoking habits, pregnancy complications, and type of IBD (CD/UC) were similar between groups. Rates of labor induction and birth weight were also similar between IBD MOM and IBD GI. The IBD MOM overall preterm delivery (PTD) rate (< 37 weeks) was significantly higher 18.9 versus 9.7% (P = 0.028). The IBD MOM group had a significantly higher IBD MOM disease severity score that correlated with a higher rate of PTD. The overall IBD MOM score and scores > 3 were significantly associated with PTD risk in both groups (P = 0.013 and P = 0.004, respectively).

Conclusion

Women with moderate and severe IBD who attended a multidisciplinary clinic may benefit from this unique center. Healthcare planning policies can assume that costly, multidisciplinary clinics for women with IBD should be reserved for those with moderate and severe disease.

Keywords

IBD Pregnancy Cesarean delivery Preterm birth 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have nothing to declare.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ariella Bar-Gil Shitrit
    • 1
  • Yael Cohen
    • 2
  • Ori Hassin
    • 3
  • Ami Ben Ya’acov
    • 1
  • Rivkah Farkash
    • 2
  • Benjamin Koslowsky
    • 1
  • Yael Milgrom
    • 1
  • Dan Meir Livovsky
    • 1
  • Arnon Samueloff
    • 2
  • Eran Goldin
    • 1
  • Sorina Grisaru-Granovsky
    • 2
  1. 1.IBD MOM Unit, Digestive Diseases Institute, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Affiliated with the Medical SchoolHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Affiliated with the Medical SchoolHebrew UniversityJerusalemIsrael
  3. 3.Medical SchoolBen Gurion University of the NegevBeer ShevaIsrael

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