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To what extent have international organizations triggered responses/actions at national levels to address hate crime?

  • Azra JunuzovićEmail author
Article

Abstract

This article looks at how international organizations supported increased response and actions at national level through to address hate crime based on practical experience. It argues that, while international organizations may support actions at national level and facilitate exchange of good practices, change occurs only when there is a genuine political in a country. The article also lists four major factors which may contribute to change at the national level and which may also overlap. These include: actions following public pressure after a hate crime case(s) that has stirred the public; international reputation and positioning of the government in multilateral affairs; internal factors – caused by events that may have significant impact on the security situation, and pressure from civil society groups and international organizations to respond to hate crime challenges.

Notes

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.BudapestHungary

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