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Community Mental Health Journal

, Volume 55, Issue 1, pp 83–99 | Cite as

Stakeholder Perceptions of the Barriers to Receiving and Delivering Exposure-Based Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disorders in Adult Community Mental Health Settings

  • Kate Wolitzky-TaylorEmail author
  • Bowen Chung
  • Sarah Kate Bearman
  • Joanna Arch
  • Jason Grossman
  • Karissa Fenwick
  • Rebecca Lengnick-Hall
  • Jeanne Miranda
Original Paper

Abstract

CBT is considered the first-line treatment for anxiety disorders, particularly when it involves gradual confrontation with feared stimuli (i.e., exposure); however, delivery of CBT for anxiety disorders in real-world community clinics is lacking. This study utilized surveys we developed with key stakeholder feedback (patient, provider, and administrator) to assess patient and provider/administrator perceptions of the barriers to delivering (or receiving) CBT for anxiety disorders. Providers/administrators from two counties in California (N = 106) indicated lack of training/competency as primary barriers. Patients in one large county (N = 42) reported their own symptoms most often impacted treatment receipt. Both groups endorsed acceptability of exposure but indicated that its use in treatment provided/received had been limited. Implications and recommendations are discussed.

Keywords

Anxiety disorders Community mental health Cognitive behavioral therapy Community mental health 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no disclosures or conflicts of interest.

Ethical Approval

This study was conducted in line with ethical guidelines for the conduct of human subjects research. It was approved by the Institutional Review Board. The authors have no disclosures or conflicts of interest.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kate Wolitzky-Taylor
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
    Email author
  • Bowen Chung
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Sarah Kate Bearman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Joanna Arch
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jason Grossman
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Karissa Fenwick
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Rebecca Lengnick-Hall
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  • Jeanne Miranda
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral SciencesUniversity of California-Los AngelesLos AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Department of Social WorkUniversity of Southern CaliforniaLos AngelesUSA
  3. 3.Department of Educational PsychologyUniversity of Texas at AustinAustinUSA
  4. 4.Department of Psychology and NeuroscienceUniversity of Colorado-BoulderBoulderUSA

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