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Cluster Computing

, Volume 22, Supplement 1, pp 943–948 | Cite as

Prototype implementation of the OpenGL ES 2.0 shading language offline compiler

  • Nakhoon Baek
  • Kuinam J. KimEmail author
Article
  • 151 Downloads

Abstract

Latest 3D graphics libraries, including OpenGL and OpenGL ES, provide programmable rendering pipelines. These programmable pipelines naturally requires special-purpose programming languages. It is so called OpenGL Shading Language in the case of OpenGL. In this paper, we show a new compact design scheme for the implementation of OpenGL SL offline compilers. This scheme is used for our OpenGL SL offline compiler prototype implementation. Our implementation shows feasibility and correctness with respect to the standard specification.

Keywords

OpenGL ES Shading language Offline compiler Design Prototype implementation 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology (Grant 2016R1D1A3B03935488).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Computer Science and EngineeringKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  2. 2.Software Technology Research CenterKyungpook National UniversityDaeguRepublic of Korea
  3. 3.dassomey.com Inc.DaeguRepublic of Korea
  4. 4.Department of Convergence SecurityKyunggi UniversitySuwon-siRepublic of Korea

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