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Cellulose

, Volume 26, Issue 18, pp 9439–9446 | Cite as

Effects of alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment on cellulose accessibility of switchgrass pretreated by acidic deep eutectic solvent

  • Zhu Chen
  • Yisheng Sun
  • Caixia WanEmail author
Original Research
  • 138 Downloads

Abstract

Choline chloride: lactic acid (ChCl:LA) is a promising green acidic deep eutectic solvent for biomass fractionation and lignin extraction. This study reported an efficient ChCl:LA pretreatment for delignification and xylan solubilization from biomass. Under a mild condition (30 min, 130 °C), 83.4% lignin and 80.4% xylan were selectively removed from switchgrass. The pretreated switchgrass was highly enriched with cellulose (71.4%), but showed slow release of sugar. Its enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency was much improved by alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP) post-treatment. Synergistic effects of AHP suggested that additional physical barrier to cellulose accessibility could be created through side reactions between LA and cellulose. After AHP post-treatment, cellulose became highly accessible and digestible, with 94.1% glucose yield even at a high solid loading (20%). ChCl:LA can be recycled and reused without conditioning although pretreatment effectiveness diminished gradually. Overall, an efficient ChCl:LA pretreatment was developed for biomass pretreatment, and possible interaction between LA and cellulose during the pretreatment can be decoupled by AHP post-treatment.

Keywords

Deep eutectic solvent Choline chloride Lactic acid Pretreatment Enzymatic hydrolysis Lignocellulosic biomass Cellulose 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no competing interests.

Supplementary material

10570_2019_2759_MOESM1_ESM.pdf (459 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (PDF 460 kb)

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Biomedical, Bioengineering, and Chemical EngineeringUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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