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Cellulose

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An optimum combined hydrolysis factor enhances hybrid Pennisetum pretreatment in bio-conversion

  • Jingzhi Zhang
  • Xiaoxu Qu
  • Guiying Zhu
  • Xu ZhangEmail author
  • Tianwei Tan
Original Research
  • 8 Downloads

Abstract

It is important to limit the formation of inhibitors when bio-refining lignocellulose for bioethanol production by steam explosion pretreatment. In this research, we found steam explosion with sulfite (SES) was an effective and efficient pretreatment for hybrid Pennisetum which was crossed by Pennisetum americanum and P.purpureum (Pennisetum americanum × P.purpureum) bio-conversion. The combined hydrolysis factor (CHF) derived from the kinetic models of hemicellulose hydrolysis and inhibitors formation was a useful indicator of pretreatment severity for a steam explosion with sulfite (SES) pretreatment. The apparent activation energy of hybrid Pennisetum pretreated by SES fitting with CHF (CHFses) was ~ 90 kJ/mol. CHFses can be used as predicting hemicellulose dissolution and substrate enzymatic digestion (SED), as well as balancing the trade-off between xylan remaining (XRses) and inhibitor formation. The correlation between CHFses and XRses was XRses = 0.78eCHFses + 0.22e−0.282CHFses, and the relationship between XRses and SED was SED = \(28 + 221e^{{-X}_{R}ses/0.04}\). The xylan removal can reach up to 90% under mild conditions (temperature, pressure, and so on.) and was linearly related to enzymatic hydrolysis. CHFses determined in this study were effective in the experimental design of pretreatment for bioconversion of hybrid Pennisetum.

Keywords

Hybrid Pennisetum Bio-ethanol Combined Hydrolysis Factor Kinetics Steam explosion 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to express their thanks for the support from the National Key Research and Development Program of China (2017YFB0306800), the 111project (B13005) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 21808123).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jingzhi Zhang
    • 1
    • 2
  • Xiaoxu Qu
    • 1
  • Guiying Zhu
    • 1
  • Xu Zhang
    • 1
    Email author
  • Tianwei Tan
    • 1
  1. 1.National Energy R&D Center for Biorefinery, College of Life Science and TechnologyBeijing University of Chemical TechnologyBeijingChina
  2. 2.Department of Chemical Engineering, Institute of Applied ChemistryTsinghua UniversityBeijingChina

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