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Cellulose

, Volume 26, Issue 10, pp 6291–6302 | Cite as

Fabrication of grease resistant paper with non-fluorinated chemicals for food packaging

  • Junjiao Sheng
  • Junrong Li
  • Lihong ZhaoEmail author
Original Research
  • 100 Downloads

Abstract

The oleophilic nature of paper often limits its use in applications that involve direct contact with grease, but now the generation of oil-repellent surfaces has almost universally deployed environmentally detrimental approaches relying on fluorinated compounds. In this paper, non-toxic fluoro-free grease-proof papers coated with sodium alginate (SA)/sodium carboxymethyl cellulose and SA/propylene glycol alginate were prepared, the maximum of kit values reached 9. The coatings completely covered the base paper surface and penetrated into the interfiber networks to some extent, and the modified mechanical properties were obtained. It was found that the lower the air permeability was, the better the oil resistance of the biopolymer coatings on fiber substrate was. For coatings with high surface energy, as the surface energy is dominated by the polar part, the stronger the polarity, the greater the repulsion to oil. The reduction of surface energy can effectively improve the anti-wettability for oil and water.

Keywords

Sodium alginate Sodium carboxymethyl cellulose Propylene glycol alginate Grease resistance 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21706083), State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper Engineering (201838) and National Key R&D Program of China (2017YFB0309501).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature B.V. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Pulp and Paper EngineeringSouth China University of TechnologyGuangzhouChina

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