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Cancer Causes & Control

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 113–120 | Cite as

Reproductive and menopausal factors and risk of second primary breast cancer after in situ breast carcinoma

  • Michelle L. BagliaEmail author
  • Mei-Tzu C. Tang
  • Kathleen E. Malone
  • Peggy Porter
  • Christopher I. Li
Original paper
  • 66 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

In situ breast cancer patients have a higher risk of developing a second primary breast cancer than women in the general population have of developing breast cancer. We have limited understanding of why some women with a previous in situ breast cancer develop second primary breast cancers while others do not.

Methods

In this population-based nested case–control study, we evaluated the association between reproductive and menopausal factors and risk of developing a second primary breast cancer among women with a previous in situ breast cancer. Using conditional logistic regression, these associations were evaluated in 552 cases and 1032 individually matched controls.

Results

Older age at menarche was associated with risk of second primary breast cancer among women with a previous in situ breast cancer (compared to age < 12, age 13: OR 0.60 (0.42, 0.85); age ≥ 14: OR 0.69 (0.47, 1.00); Ptrend = 0.07). Breastfeeding for > 12 months was associated with a decreased risk of developing a second primary breast cancer (OR 0.62 (0.39, 0.98)). No associations were observed for other reproductive or menopausal factors evaluated.

Conclusions

Results from this study suggest that reproductive factors may play a role in development of a second primary breast cancer after diagnosis of in situ breast carcinoma.

Keywords

Breast cancer Reproductive In situ breast cancer Menopausal hormone therapy 

Notes

Funding

This study was funded by the National Cancer Institute (R01-CA097271). Michelle Baglia is funded by T32-CA009168.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle L. Baglia
    • 1
    Email author
  • Mei-Tzu C. Tang
    • 1
  • Kathleen E. Malone
    • 1
  • Peggy Porter
    • 1
  • Christopher I. Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Public Health SciencesFred Hutchinson Cancer Research CenterSeattleUSA

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