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Journal of Business Ethics

, Volume 153, Issue 3, pp 629–644 | Cite as

How Employees’ Perceptions of CSR Increase Employee Creativity: Mediating Mechanisms of Compassion at Work and Intrinsic Motivation

  • Won-Moo Hur
  • Tae-Won Moon
  • Sung-Hoon Ko
Article

Abstract

This study aims to examine how service employees’ perceptions of corporate social responsibility (CSR) affect their creativity at work and its mediated link through compassion at work and their intrinsic motivation. Working with a sample of 250 hotel employees in South Korea, structural equation modeling is employed to test research hypotheses. The results of this research suggest that employees’ perceptions of CSR are positively related to employee creativity. Second, compassion at work mediated the positive relationship between employees’ perceptions of CSR and creativity. Third, employees’ intrinsic motivation also mediated the positive relationship between employees’ perceptions of CSR and employee creativity. Finally, the relationship between employees’ perceptions of CSR and employee creativity is sequentially and fully mediated by compassion at work and their intrinsic motivation. The theoretical and managerial implications of the results and limitations of the study are discussed, and future research directions are suggested.

Keywords

Employees’ CSR perceptions Compassion at work Intrinsic motivation Employee creativity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work was supported by a Research Grant of Pukyong National University (2016).

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Business AdministrationPukyong National UniversityBusanSouth Korea
  2. 2.School of Business AdministrationHongik UniversitySeoulSouth Korea

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