Advertisement

Brain Topography

, Volume 32, Issue 2, pp 283–285 | Cite as

Exploratory Study of Low Resolution Electromagnetic Tomography (LORETA) Real-Time Z-Score Feedback in the Treatment of Pain in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer

  • S. PrinslooEmail author
  • D. I. Rosenthal
  • R. Lyle
  • S. M. Garcia
  • S. Gabel-Zepeda
  • R. Cannon
  • E. Bruera
  • L. Cohen
Brief Communication

Abstract

Acute pain from mucositis in patients with head and neck cancer (HNC) undergoing radiation therapy (RT) is common, and may not respond well to narcotics. We used low resolution electromagnetic tomography z-score neurofeedback (LFBz) to investigate whether patients could modify brain wave activity associated with acute pain and whether this would reduce the experience of pain. HNC patients scheduled for RT had baseline pre-pain onset measures (EEG and numeric rating scale) collected before RT and then at pain onset before using analgesics, after each LFBz session and at the end of RT. Up to six sessions of LFBz training were offered over the remaining RT. Up to six 20-min sessions of LFBz were offered over the remaining RT. Data were collected before and after each LFBz session and at the end of RT. Seventeen patients recruited; fourteen were treated and reported decreased pain perception. LFBz allowed patients to modify their brain activity in predesignated areas of the pain matrix toward the direction of their baseline, pre-pain condition (including Brodmann areas (BAs) 3, 4, 5, 13, 24, and 33). LFBz can modify brain regions relevant for pain and these changes were associated with self-reported decreases in pain perception.

Keywords

EEG Neurofeedback LORETA Pain Cancer 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge our participants and Bob Thatcher (Neuroguide) for his software scholarship.

Funding

Supported by Grant Number PF-11-169-01-PCSM from the American Cancer Society, 1K01AT008485-01 from the National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health, The Rising Tide Foundation, and by The Hille Foundation.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors have no financial interest and nothing to disclose.

Supplementary material

10548_2018_686_MOESM1_ESM.docx (585 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 584 KB)

References

  1. Clarkson JE, Worthington HV, Furness S, McCabe M, Khalid T, Meyer S (2010) Interventions for treating oral mucositis for patients with cancer receiving treatment. Cochrane Database Syst Rev 8:CD001973Google Scholar
  2. Congedo M, Lubar JF, Joffe D (2004) Low-resolution electromagnetic tomography neurofeedback. IEEE Trans Neural Syst Rehabil Eng 12(4):387–397CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Ling IS, Larsson B (2011) Individualized pharmacological treatment of oral mucositis pain in patients with head and neck cancer receiving radiotherapy. Support Care Cancer 19(9):1343–1350CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Moont R, Pud D, Sprecher E, Sharvit G, Yarnitsky D (2010) ‘Pain inhibits pain’ mechanisms: is pain modulation simply due to distraction? Pain 150(1):113–120CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Piche M, Arsenault M, Rainville P (2009) Cerebral and cerebrospinal processes underlying counterirritation analgesia. J Neurosci 29(45):14236–14246CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Rosenthal DI (2007) Consequences of mucositis-induced treatment breaks and dose reductions on head and neck cancer treatment outcomes. J Support Oncol 5(9 Suppl 4):23–31Google Scholar
  7. Valet M, Sprenger T, Boecker H, Willoch F, Rummeny E, Conrad B, Erhard P, Tolle TR (2004) Distraction modulates connectivity of the cingulo-frontal cortex and the midbrain during pain—an fMRI analysis. Pain 109(3):399–408CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Prinsloo
    • 1
    Email author
  • D. I. Rosenthal
    • 2
  • R. Lyle
    • 3
  • S. M. Garcia
    • 2
  • S. Gabel-Zepeda
    • 1
  • R. Cannon
    • 4
  • E. Bruera
    • 1
  • L. Cohen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Palliative, Rehabilitation, and Integrative MedicineThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Radiation OncologyThe University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer CenterHoustonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Marriage and Family TherapyMount Mercy UniversityCedar RapidsUSA
  4. 4.Neural Potential, LLCRoyal Palm BeachUSA

Personalised recommendations