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Role of α-Fetoprotein in Regulation of Proliferation and Functional Activity of Naïve T Cells and Immune Memory T Cells

  • S. A. ZamorinaEmail author
  • L. S. Litvinova
  • K. A. Yurova
  • O. G. Khaziakhmatova
  • V. P. Timganova
  • M. S. Bochkova
  • P. V. Khramtsov
  • M. B. Raev
  • V. A. Chereshnev
IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY
  • 4 Downloads

We studied the role of native α-fetoprotein preparation in the regulation of proliferation and functional activity of naïve T cells and immune memory T cells in vitro. The study was carried out on separated fractions of naïve T cells (CD45RA+) and immune memory T cells (CD45R0+) incubated with α-fetoprotein under conditions of TCR activation. At the level of naïve T cells, α-fetoprotein in a concentration of 100 U/ml reduced the expression of CD28, but increased the expression of CD25, while at the level of immune memory T cells α-fetoprotein (50 and 100 U/ml) only suppressed the expression of CD25. No effects of α-fetoprotein on the proliferative status of the studied lymphocyte subpopulations and on the expression of CD71 (proliferation marker) by these cells were detected. Addition of α-fetoprotein in a concentration of 100 U/ml increased the level of IL-2 in naïve T cell culture supernatants, while production of IL-2 by memory T cells remained unchanged. These data demonstrated the priority aspects of regulation of the functional activities of naïve T cells and immune memory T cells.

Key Words

α-fetoprotein naïve T cells immune memory T cells proliferation IL-2 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. A. Zamorina
    • 1
    Email author
  • L. S. Litvinova
    • 2
  • K. A. Yurova
    • 2
  • O. G. Khaziakhmatova
    • 2
  • V. P. Timganova
    • 1
  • M. S. Bochkova
    • 1
  • P. V. Khramtsov
    • 1
    • 2
  • M. B. Raev
    • 1
  • V. A. Chereshnev
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Institute of Ecology and Genetics of MicroorganismsUral Division of the Russian Academy of SciencesPermRussia
  2. 2.I. Kant Baltic Federal UniversityKaliningradRussia
  3. 3.Institute of Immunology and PhysiologyUral Division of the Russian Academy of SciencesYekaterinburgRussia

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