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Effect of Storage Conditions on the Integrity of Human Umbilical Cord Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Derived Microvesicles

  • Yu. A. RomanovEmail author
  • N. E. Volgina
  • T. N. Dugina
  • N. V. Kabaeva
  • G. T. Sukhikh
Translated from Kletochnye Tekhnologii v Biologii i Meditsine (Cell Technologies in Biology and Medicine)
  • 3 Downloads

We studied the effect of storage conditions on the safety of microvesicles produced by human multipotent umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells into the conditioned medium. It was found that microvesicles can be stored without serious degradation for up to 1 week at 4°С, but were almost completely destroyed during freezing and thawing cycles irrespective of the storage temperatures (-20°С, -70°С, or -196°С). Similar results were obtained for lyophilized medium conditioned by human multipotent umbilical cord mesenchymal stromal cells. Addition of a cryoprotectant (5-10% DMSO) followed by freezing and/or lyophilization preserved microvesicles at a nearly initial level. These findings indicate that during storage, microvesicles, being membrane structures, behave similar to living cells and require appropriate conditions for prolonged storage.

Key Words

microvesicles multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells umbilical cord storage flow cytometry 

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu. A. Romanov
    • 1
    • 3
    Email author
  • N. E. Volgina
    • 2
  • T. N. Dugina
    • 3
  • N. V. Kabaeva
    • 1
  • G. T. Sukhikh
    • 2
  1. 1.National Medical Research Center for Cardiology, Ministry of Health of the Russian FederationNovosibirskRussia
  2. 2.V. I. Kulakov National Medical Research Center for Obstetrics, Gynecology, and Perinatology, Ministry of Health of the Russian FederationMoscowRussia
  3. 3.CryoCenterMoscowRussia

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