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A Low-Molecular-Weight Phenotype of Apolipoprotein(a) as a Factor Provoking Accumulation of Cholesterol by THP-1 Monocyte-Like Cells

  • O. I. Afanas’evaEmail author
  • E. B. Vikhrova
  • O. A. Razova
  • E. A. Utkina
  • M. I. Afanas’eva
  • E. A. Klesareva
  • N. V. Radyukhina
  • T. I. Aref’eva
  • S. N. Pokrovsky
Article
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Increased concentration of lipoprotein(a) is a risk factor of coronary heart disease. lipoprotein(a) consists of LDL-like and highly polymorphic apolipoprotein(a). Here we studied the effect of lipoprotein(a)-containing sera with different apolipoprotein(a) phenotypes on lipid accumulation by THP-1 monocyte-like cells. Cholesterol concentration in lysates of THP-1 cells was significantly higher after their incubation with lipoprotein(a)-containing serum samples with low-molecular-weight phenotype of apolipoprotein(a) in comparison with samples with a high-molecular-weight apolipoprotein(a) phenotype irrespective of initial cholesterol level as well as serum concentrations of apoB-100, oxidized LDL, and circulating immune complexes. The presence of the most atherogenic small dense LDL subfractions in examined sera in addition to a low-molecular-weight apolipoprotein(a) phenotype resulted in significant elevation of cholesterol accumulation by THP-1 cells. The data obtained explain greater atherogenicity of lipoprotein(a) with low-molecular-weight apolipoprotein(a) phenotype.

Key Words

lipoprotein(a) apo(a) phenotype macrophages THP-1 cells lipoprotein subfractions 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • O. I. Afanas’eva
    • 1
    Email author
  • E. B. Vikhrova
    • 1
  • O. A. Razova
    • 1
  • E. A. Utkina
    • 1
  • M. I. Afanas’eva
    • 1
  • E. A. Klesareva
    • 1
  • N. V. Radyukhina
    • 1
  • T. I. Aref’eva
    • 1
  • S. N. Pokrovsky
    • 1
  1. 1.National Medical Research Center of CardiologyMinistry of Health of the RussiaMoscowRussia

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