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Bulletin of Experimental Biology and Medicine

, Volume 166, Issue 3, pp 348–352 | Cite as

Effect of Activated Immunocompetent Cells on the Number of Multipotent Stromal Cells in Bone Marrow Transplants of CBA and CBA/N Mice in a Short Time after Polyvinylpyrrolidone Administration to Animals

  • Yu. F. GorskayaEmail author
  • A. I. Tukhvatulin
  • A. Sh. Dzharullaeva
  • E. N. Semenova
  • E. V. Nagurskaya
  • V. A. Bekhalo
  • V. G. Nesterenko
IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY
  • 15 Downloads

One hour after polyvinylpyrrolidone administration, the content of multipotent stromal cells in the spleen of CBA and CBA/N mice increased almost equally (by 2.5 and 2.9 times, respectively), but in 24 h, the effectiveness of multipotent stromal cell cloning in the spleen of CBA/N mice decreased almost to the control level, whereas in CBA mice, the number of multipotent stromal cells continued to increase. Serum concentration of IL-5, TNFα, and IL-2 in both lines was elevated in 1 h after polyvinylpyrrolidone administration, which is likely to reflect activation of the innate immunity. One day after polyvinylpyrrolidone administration, the number of multipotent stromal cells in bone marrow transplants in the CBA/N→CBA/N and CBA→CBA/N groups remained practically unchanged, while in groups CBA→CBA and CBA/N→CBA it was equally increased (by 3.6 and 3.4 times, respectively). Thus, the number of multipotent stromal cells in bone marrow transplants after 1 day was increased only in groups where recipients (CBA mice) were capable of responding to polyvinylpyrrolidone administration, i.e. the number of stromal cells by this term, was apparently determined by the presence of activated immunocompetent cells. These findings also indicate that activation of the stromal tissue dur ing immune response can have a two-phasic pattern: the first phase (1 h after antigen adminis tration) can be determined by activation of innate immunity receptors (in multipotent stromal cells or other cells) observed in CBA and CBA/N mice, and the second phase occurs during further development of the immune response (that was observed in CBA mice, but not in CBA/N mice due to absence of CD+B-1a lymphocytes). The findings attest to close interactions between the stromal tissue and the immune system.

Key Words

stromal cells MSC immune response 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yu. F. Gorskaya
    • 1
    Email author
  • A. I. Tukhvatulin
    • 2
  • A. Sh. Dzharullaeva
    • 2
  • E. N. Semenova
    • 1
  • E. V. Nagurskaya
    • 1
  • V. A. Bekhalo
    • 1
  • V. G. Nesterenko
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Immunity Regulation and Immunological ToleranceMoscowRussia
  2. 2.Laboratory of Cell Microbiology, N. F. Gamaleya Federal Research Center of Epidemiology and MicrobiologyMinistry of Health of the Russian FederationMoscowRussia

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